Efficient water use in residential urban landscapes

Rolston St. Hilaire, Michael A. Arnold, Don C. Wilkerson, Dale A. Devitt, Brian H. Hurd, Bruce J. Lesikar, Virginia I. Lohr, Chris Martin, Garry V. McDonald, Robert L. Morris, Dennis R. Pittenger, David A. Shaw, David F. Zoldoske

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

92 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In the United States, urban population growth, improved living standards, limited development of new water supplies, and dwindling current water supplies are causing the demand for treated municipal water to exceed the supply. Although water used to irrigate the residential urban landscape will vary according to factors such as landscape type, management practices, and region, landscape irrigation can vary from 40% to 70% of household use of water. So, the efficient use of irrigation water in urban landscapes must be the primary focus of water conservation. In addition, plants in a typical residential landscape often are given more water than is required to maintain ecosystem services such as carbon regulation, climate control, and preservation of aesthetic appearance. This implies that improvements in the efficiency of landscape irrigation will yield significant water savings. Urban areas across the United States face different water supply and demand issues and a range of factors will affect how water is used in the urban landscape. The purpose of this review is to summarize how irrigation and water application technologies; landscape design and management strategies; the relationship among people, plants, and the urban landscape; the reuse of water resources; economic and noneconomic incentives; and policy and ordinances impact the efficient use of water in the urban landscape.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2081-2092
Number of pages12
JournalHortScience
Volume43
Issue number7
StatePublished - Dec 2008

Fingerprint

water
water supply
irrigation
public water supply
urban population
landscaping
landscape management
application technology
supply balance
aesthetics
water conservation
ecosystem services
water resources
urban areas
irrigation water
households
population growth
climate
economics
carbon

Keywords

  • Conservation
  • Irrigation
  • Landscape preference
  • Ordinance
  • Reuse water
  • Xeriscape

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Horticulture

Cite this

St. Hilaire, R., Arnold, M. A., Wilkerson, D. C., Devitt, D. A., Hurd, B. H., Lesikar, B. J., ... Zoldoske, D. F. (2008). Efficient water use in residential urban landscapes. HortScience, 43(7), 2081-2092.

Efficient water use in residential urban landscapes. / St. Hilaire, Rolston; Arnold, Michael A.; Wilkerson, Don C.; Devitt, Dale A.; Hurd, Brian H.; Lesikar, Bruce J.; Lohr, Virginia I.; Martin, Chris; McDonald, Garry V.; Morris, Robert L.; Pittenger, Dennis R.; Shaw, David A.; Zoldoske, David F.

In: HortScience, Vol. 43, No. 7, 12.2008, p. 2081-2092.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

St. Hilaire, R, Arnold, MA, Wilkerson, DC, Devitt, DA, Hurd, BH, Lesikar, BJ, Lohr, VI, Martin, C, McDonald, GV, Morris, RL, Pittenger, DR, Shaw, DA & Zoldoske, DF 2008, 'Efficient water use in residential urban landscapes', HortScience, vol. 43, no. 7, pp. 2081-2092.
St. Hilaire R, Arnold MA, Wilkerson DC, Devitt DA, Hurd BH, Lesikar BJ et al. Efficient water use in residential urban landscapes. HortScience. 2008 Dec;43(7):2081-2092.
St. Hilaire, Rolston ; Arnold, Michael A. ; Wilkerson, Don C. ; Devitt, Dale A. ; Hurd, Brian H. ; Lesikar, Bruce J. ; Lohr, Virginia I. ; Martin, Chris ; McDonald, Garry V. ; Morris, Robert L. ; Pittenger, Dennis R. ; Shaw, David A. ; Zoldoske, David F. / Efficient water use in residential urban landscapes. In: HortScience. 2008 ; Vol. 43, No. 7. pp. 2081-2092.
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