Effects of the United States alcohol warning label on adolescents

David Mackinnon, Liva Nohre

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

This article summarizes research on the effects of the United States alcohol warning label on adolescents. Most research evaluating alcohol warning effects on adolescents is from a study consisting of repeated cross-sectional samples of tenth and twelfth graders starting before the warning was required in 1989 and collected each year until 1995. There were substantial changes over time in awareness of and memory for the content of the warning label, but these effects leveled off after a few years. There was not convincing evidence of changes in alcohol-related beliefs, alcohol use, or risky alcohol-related behaviors as a result of the warning. Laboratory studies of the alcohol warning label explored issues regarding the optimal warning label content These results were generally consistent with other research with adult participants.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the XIVth Triennial Congress of the International Ergonomics Association and 44th Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Association, 'Ergonomics for the New Millennium'
Pages806-809
Number of pages4
StatePublished - 2000
EventProceedings of the XIVth Triennial Congress of the International Ergonomics Association and 44th Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Association, 'Ergonomics for the New Millennnium' - San Diego, CA, United States
Duration: Jul 29 2000Aug 4 2000

Other

OtherProceedings of the XIVth Triennial Congress of the International Ergonomics Association and 44th Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Association, 'Ergonomics for the New Millennnium'
CountryUnited States
CitySan Diego, CA
Period7/29/008/4/00

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human Factors and Ergonomics

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Effects of the United States alcohol warning label on adolescents'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this