Effects of tempo on the perceived speed of human movement

Kathleya Afanador, Todd Ingalls, Ellen Campana

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

Studies in crossmodal perception often use very simplified auditory and visual contexts. While these studies have been theoretically valuable, it is sometimes difficult to see how the findings can be ecologically valid or practically valuable. This study hypothesizes that a musical parameter (tempo) may affect the perception of a human movement quality (speed) and finds that although there are clear limitations, this may be a promising first step towards widening both the contexts in which crossmodal effects are studied and the application areas in which the findings can be used.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages512-515
Number of pages4
StatePublished - Jan 1 2007
EventInternational Computer Music Conference, ICMC 2007 - Copenhagen, Denmark
Duration: Aug 27 2007Aug 31 2007

Conference

ConferenceInternational Computer Music Conference, ICMC 2007
CountryDenmark
CityCopenhagen
Period8/27/078/31/07

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Ecologically Valid
Hearing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Media Technology
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Music

Cite this

Afanador, K., Ingalls, T., & Campana, E. (2007). Effects of tempo on the perceived speed of human movement. 512-515. Paper presented at International Computer Music Conference, ICMC 2007, Copenhagen, Denmark.

Effects of tempo on the perceived speed of human movement. / Afanador, Kathleya; Ingalls, Todd; Campana, Ellen.

2007. 512-515 Paper presented at International Computer Music Conference, ICMC 2007, Copenhagen, Denmark.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Afanador, K, Ingalls, T & Campana, E 2007, 'Effects of tempo on the perceived speed of human movement', Paper presented at International Computer Music Conference, ICMC 2007, Copenhagen, Denmark, 8/27/07 - 8/31/07 pp. 512-515.
Afanador K, Ingalls T, Campana E. Effects of tempo on the perceived speed of human movement. 2007. Paper presented at International Computer Music Conference, ICMC 2007, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Afanador, Kathleya ; Ingalls, Todd ; Campana, Ellen. / Effects of tempo on the perceived speed of human movement. Paper presented at International Computer Music Conference, ICMC 2007, Copenhagen, Denmark.4 p.
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