Effects of stress, coping style, and confidence on basic combat training attrition

Thomas W. Davis, Thurmon Lockhart

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Each year the military loses hundreds of millions of dollars invested in enlistees whom never make it to their first duty station. Investigators have reported that the transition process from civilian to military in basic combat training tends to be very stressful and anxiety provoking for enlistees. However, little data have been gathered to assess the relationship of enlistees' stress levels and their attrition rate. A study was conducted of 155 Soldiers during their nine-week basic combat training at Fort Jackson, South Carolina. It was hypothesized that enlistees with higher levels of stress would also have a higher level of depression and hostility resulting in performance degradation. The results showed a statistically significant positive relationship among perceived stress, hostility and depression levels; furthermore, participants who were able to modify their coping mechanism tended to be more confident in successfully completing training and less likely to receive disciplinary action.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society
Pages855-859
Number of pages5
Volume2
StatePublished - 2007
Externally publishedYes
Event51st Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2007 - Baltimore, MD, United States
Duration: Oct 1 2007Oct 5 2007

Other

Other51st Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2007
CountryUnited States
CityBaltimore, MD
Period10/1/0710/5/07

Fingerprint

coping
confidence
Military
soldier
Degradation
dollar
anxiety
performance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human Factors and Ergonomics

Cite this

Davis, T. W., & Lockhart, T. (2007). Effects of stress, coping style, and confidence on basic combat training attrition. In Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society (Vol. 2, pp. 855-859)

Effects of stress, coping style, and confidence on basic combat training attrition. / Davis, Thomas W.; Lockhart, Thurmon.

Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society. Vol. 2 2007. p. 855-859.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Davis, TW & Lockhart, T 2007, Effects of stress, coping style, and confidence on basic combat training attrition. in Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society. vol. 2, pp. 855-859, 51st Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2007, Baltimore, MD, United States, 10/1/07.
Davis TW, Lockhart T. Effects of stress, coping style, and confidence on basic combat training attrition. In Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society. Vol. 2. 2007. p. 855-859
Davis, Thomas W. ; Lockhart, Thurmon. / Effects of stress, coping style, and confidence on basic combat training attrition. Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society. Vol. 2 2007. pp. 855-859
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