Effects of stress and social support on mothers and premature and full-term infants.

Keith Crnic, M. T. Greenberg, A. S. Ragozin, N. M. Robinson, R. B. Basham

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

530 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined the relationships of stress and social support to maternal attitudes and early mother-infant interactive behavior. 52 mother-premature infant pairs and 53 mother-full-term infant pairs were seen for structured home interviews at 1 month, and behavioral interactions at 4 months. Maternal life stress, social support, life satisfaction, and satisfaction with parenting were assessed at the 1-month home visit. Although no group differences were found, both stress and support significantly predicted maternal attitudes at 1 month and interactive behavior at 4 months when data were pooled. Mothers with greater stress were less positive in their attitudes and behavior, while mothers with greater support were significantly more positive. Intimate support proved to have the most general positive effects. Additionally, social support moderated the adverse effects of stress on mother's life satisfaction and on several behavioral variables. Maternal social support was further found to have several significant effects on infant interactive behavior. Results are discussed in terms of the ecological significance of social support to parenting and infants' early development.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)209-217
Number of pages9
JournalChild Development
Volume54
Issue number1
StatePublished - Feb 1983
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Social Support
social support
infant
Mothers
Infant Behavior
Parenting
House Calls
Child Development
Psychological Stress
Premature Infants
interaction
interview
Interviews
Group

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Crnic, K., Greenberg, M. T., Ragozin, A. S., Robinson, N. M., & Basham, R. B. (1983). Effects of stress and social support on mothers and premature and full-term infants. Child Development, 54(1), 209-217.

Effects of stress and social support on mothers and premature and full-term infants. / Crnic, Keith; Greenberg, M. T.; Ragozin, A. S.; Robinson, N. M.; Basham, R. B.

In: Child Development, Vol. 54, No. 1, 02.1983, p. 209-217.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Crnic, K, Greenberg, MT, Ragozin, AS, Robinson, NM & Basham, RB 1983, 'Effects of stress and social support on mothers and premature and full-term infants.', Child Development, vol. 54, no. 1, pp. 209-217.
Crnic K, Greenberg MT, Ragozin AS, Robinson NM, Basham RB. Effects of stress and social support on mothers and premature and full-term infants. Child Development. 1983 Feb;54(1):209-217.
Crnic, Keith ; Greenberg, M. T. ; Ragozin, A. S. ; Robinson, N. M. ; Basham, R. B. / Effects of stress and social support on mothers and premature and full-term infants. In: Child Development. 1983 ; Vol. 54, No. 1. pp. 209-217.
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