Effects of selected insecticide formulations, phased application and colony management strategies on honey bee mortality in processing sweetcorn

E. H. Erickson, B. H. Erickson, P. K. Flottum, J. A. Wyman, J. L. Wedberg, Robert Page

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

These studies were undertaken to evaluate different strategies for reducing losses of honey bees (Apis mellifera) due to the use of insecticides in commercial sweetcorn (Zea mays) production fields. The strategies were: (1), insecticide application timed to avoid peak flowering periods in sweetcorn; (2), insecticide formulation, including carbofuran, encapsulated methyl parathion, permethrin and a tank mix of carbaryl plus parathion; (3), the use of pollen traps to prevent contaminated pollen coming into the hive; and (4), feeding (engorgement) of colonies with sugar syrup immediately following insecticide application to reduce honey bee foraging. Timing of insecticide applications was ineffective and a practical impossibility. Bee mortality was less with permethrin than with the other materials tested. Pollen traps and colony feeding may reduce bee mortality under some circumstances; however, these strategies proved unreliable and further study is needed. The data show that bees foraging on ragweed (Ambrosia spp.) adjacent to sweetcorn fields, rather than on sweetcorn, may be responsible for generating the excessive bee losses associated with sweetcorn. The results further indicate that circumstances in each field are unique due to prevailing conditions at each site, e.g. clean cultivation, competing resources, insecticide tank mixes, and other nearby applications. Finally, we find it highly significant that we were unable to induce high levels of bee mortality by applying our test compounds at the rate given by the manufacturers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3-13
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Apicultural Research
Volume36
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1997
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

pesticide formulations
sweetcorn
honey bees
Apoidea
pesticide application
permethrin
insecticides
foraging
Ambrosia
parathion-methyl
engorgement
parathion
carbofuran
carbaryl
syrups
Apis mellifera
Zea mays
pollen
flowering
sugars

Keywords

  • Apis mellifera
  • Feeding sugar syrup
  • Honey bees
  • Insecticides
  • Maize
  • Management
  • Mortality
  • Pollen traps
  • Sweetcorn
  • USA
  • Zea mays

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Insect Science

Cite this

Effects of selected insecticide formulations, phased application and colony management strategies on honey bee mortality in processing sweetcorn. / Erickson, E. H.; Erickson, B. H.; Flottum, P. K.; Wyman, J. A.; Wedberg, J. L.; Page, Robert.

In: Journal of Apicultural Research, Vol. 36, No. 1, 1997, p. 3-13.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Erickson, E. H. ; Erickson, B. H. ; Flottum, P. K. ; Wyman, J. A. ; Wedberg, J. L. ; Page, Robert. / Effects of selected insecticide formulations, phased application and colony management strategies on honey bee mortality in processing sweetcorn. In: Journal of Apicultural Research. 1997 ; Vol. 36, No. 1. pp. 3-13.
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