Effects of outcome expectancy and timing of self monitoring on cigarette smoking

Paul Karoly, W. W. Doyle

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

College students (N = 56) volunteered to participate in an experiment that dealt with smokers' attitudes, and techniques to alter smoking behavior. Students were assigned to one of 4 conditions: high expectancy for smoking reduction, monitoring of urges to smoke; high expectancy for reduction, monitoring of completed cigarettes; low expectancy for smoking reduction, monitoring urges; and low expectancy for reduction, monitoring completed cigarettes. Expectancies and smoking rates were measured independently, and it was found that subjects who anticipated a smoking reduction decreased smoking significantly more than low expectancy subjects. Contrary to predictions, subjects who self recorded a pretarget response (urges) did not reduce smoking more than subjects who recorded the number of completed cigarettes. Discussion focussed on factors that influence outcome expectancies and the intrusiveness of self monitoring in maladaptive behavior chains.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)351-355
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Clinical Psychology
Volume31
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1975
Externally publishedYes

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Smoking
Tobacco Products
Students
Cigarette Smoking
Self-monitoring
Expectancy
Smoke
Monitoring

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

Effects of outcome expectancy and timing of self monitoring on cigarette smoking. / Karoly, Paul; Doyle, W. W.

In: Journal of Clinical Psychology, Vol. 31, No. 2, 1975, p. 351-355.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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