Effects of moveable platform training in preventing slip-induced falls in older adults

Prakriti Parijat, Thurmon Lockhart

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

47 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Identifying effective interventions is vital in preventing slip-induced fall accidents in older adults. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the efficacy of moveable platform training in improving recovery reactions and reducing fall frequency in older adults. Twenty-four older adults were recruited and randomly assigned to two groups (training and control). Both groups underwent three sessions including baseline slip, training, and transfer of training on a slippery surface. Both groups experienced two slips on a slippery surface, one during the baseline and the other (after 2 weeks) during the transfer of training session. In the training session, the training group underwent twelve simulated slips using a moveable platform while the control group performed normal walking trials. Kinematic, kinetic, and EMG data were collected during all the sessions. Results indicated a reduced incidence of falls in the training group during the transfer of training trial as compared to the control group. The training group was able to transfer proactive and reactive control strategies learned during training to the second slip trial. The proactive adjustments include increased center-of-mass velocity and transitional acceleration after training. Reactive adjustments include reduction in muscle onset and time to peak activations of knee flexors and ankle plantar flexors, reduced ankle and knee coactivation, reduced slip displacement, and reduced time to peak knee flexion, trunk flexion, and hip flexion velocities. In general, the results indicated a beneficial effect of perturbation training in reducing slip severity and recovery kinematics in healthy older adults.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1111-1121
Number of pages11
JournalAnnals of Biomedical Engineering
Volume40
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Kinematics
Recovery
Muscle
Accidents
Chemical activation
Kinetics

Keywords

  • Biomechanics
  • Elderly
  • Fall prevention training
  • Falls
  • Locomotion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering

Cite this

Effects of moveable platform training in preventing slip-induced falls in older adults. / Parijat, Prakriti; Lockhart, Thurmon.

In: Annals of Biomedical Engineering, Vol. 40, No. 5, 05.2012, p. 1111-1121.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{72c928294db443beb0bcec938e6106fa,
title = "Effects of moveable platform training in preventing slip-induced falls in older adults",
abstract = "Identifying effective interventions is vital in preventing slip-induced fall accidents in older adults. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the efficacy of moveable platform training in improving recovery reactions and reducing fall frequency in older adults. Twenty-four older adults were recruited and randomly assigned to two groups (training and control). Both groups underwent three sessions including baseline slip, training, and transfer of training on a slippery surface. Both groups experienced two slips on a slippery surface, one during the baseline and the other (after 2 weeks) during the transfer of training session. In the training session, the training group underwent twelve simulated slips using a moveable platform while the control group performed normal walking trials. Kinematic, kinetic, and EMG data were collected during all the sessions. Results indicated a reduced incidence of falls in the training group during the transfer of training trial as compared to the control group. The training group was able to transfer proactive and reactive control strategies learned during training to the second slip trial. The proactive adjustments include increased center-of-mass velocity and transitional acceleration after training. Reactive adjustments include reduction in muscle onset and time to peak activations of knee flexors and ankle plantar flexors, reduced ankle and knee coactivation, reduced slip displacement, and reduced time to peak knee flexion, trunk flexion, and hip flexion velocities. In general, the results indicated a beneficial effect of perturbation training in reducing slip severity and recovery kinematics in healthy older adults.",
keywords = "Biomechanics, Elderly, Fall prevention training, Falls, Locomotion",
author = "Prakriti Parijat and Thurmon Lockhart",
year = "2012",
month = "5",
doi = "10.1007/s10439-011-0477-0",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "40",
pages = "1111--1121",
journal = "Annals of Biomedical Engineering",
issn = "0090-6964",
publisher = "Springer Netherlands",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effects of moveable platform training in preventing slip-induced falls in older adults

AU - Parijat, Prakriti

AU - Lockhart, Thurmon

PY - 2012/5

Y1 - 2012/5

N2 - Identifying effective interventions is vital in preventing slip-induced fall accidents in older adults. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the efficacy of moveable platform training in improving recovery reactions and reducing fall frequency in older adults. Twenty-four older adults were recruited and randomly assigned to two groups (training and control). Both groups underwent three sessions including baseline slip, training, and transfer of training on a slippery surface. Both groups experienced two slips on a slippery surface, one during the baseline and the other (after 2 weeks) during the transfer of training session. In the training session, the training group underwent twelve simulated slips using a moveable platform while the control group performed normal walking trials. Kinematic, kinetic, and EMG data were collected during all the sessions. Results indicated a reduced incidence of falls in the training group during the transfer of training trial as compared to the control group. The training group was able to transfer proactive and reactive control strategies learned during training to the second slip trial. The proactive adjustments include increased center-of-mass velocity and transitional acceleration after training. Reactive adjustments include reduction in muscle onset and time to peak activations of knee flexors and ankle plantar flexors, reduced ankle and knee coactivation, reduced slip displacement, and reduced time to peak knee flexion, trunk flexion, and hip flexion velocities. In general, the results indicated a beneficial effect of perturbation training in reducing slip severity and recovery kinematics in healthy older adults.

AB - Identifying effective interventions is vital in preventing slip-induced fall accidents in older adults. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the efficacy of moveable platform training in improving recovery reactions and reducing fall frequency in older adults. Twenty-four older adults were recruited and randomly assigned to two groups (training and control). Both groups underwent three sessions including baseline slip, training, and transfer of training on a slippery surface. Both groups experienced two slips on a slippery surface, one during the baseline and the other (after 2 weeks) during the transfer of training session. In the training session, the training group underwent twelve simulated slips using a moveable platform while the control group performed normal walking trials. Kinematic, kinetic, and EMG data were collected during all the sessions. Results indicated a reduced incidence of falls in the training group during the transfer of training trial as compared to the control group. The training group was able to transfer proactive and reactive control strategies learned during training to the second slip trial. The proactive adjustments include increased center-of-mass velocity and transitional acceleration after training. Reactive adjustments include reduction in muscle onset and time to peak activations of knee flexors and ankle plantar flexors, reduced ankle and knee coactivation, reduced slip displacement, and reduced time to peak knee flexion, trunk flexion, and hip flexion velocities. In general, the results indicated a beneficial effect of perturbation training in reducing slip severity and recovery kinematics in healthy older adults.

KW - Biomechanics

KW - Elderly

KW - Fall prevention training

KW - Falls

KW - Locomotion

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84862002994&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84862002994&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s10439-011-0477-0

DO - 10.1007/s10439-011-0477-0

M3 - Article

C2 - 22134467

AN - SCOPUS:84862002994

VL - 40

SP - 1111

EP - 1121

JO - Annals of Biomedical Engineering

JF - Annals of Biomedical Engineering

SN - 0090-6964

IS - 5

ER -