Effects of modafinil and R-modafinil on brain stimulation reward thresholds

Implications for their use in the treatment of psychostimulant dependence

Brian T. Burrows, Lucas R. Watterson, Meagan A. Johnson, Michael Olive

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. Modafinil and its enantiomer R-modafinil are approved for the treatment of various sleep disorders, and may also be efficacious in the treatment of psychostimulant abuse. However, the ability of modafinil and R-modafinil to alter brain reward function has not yet been assessed. Purpose. This study assessed the effects of modafinil and R-modafinil on brain reward function using the intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) paradigm. Study design. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were trained to respond for ICSS using current-intensity threshold determination procedures. Changes in ICSS thresholds were then assessed following administration of modafinil and R-modafinil (50, 100, and 150 mg/kg), or cocaine (2.5 mg/kg-20 mg/kg) as a positive control. Results. ICSS thresholds were reduced by modafinil at the 150 mg/kg dose, as well as by cocaine at the 10mg/kg and 20mg/kg doses. R-modafinil only produced nonsignificant trends towards reducing ICSS thresholds. Conclusion. Modafinil and R-modafinil have limited effects on brain reward function in otherwise drug-naïve subjects. Additional assessments of these effects in the context of psychostimulant dependence are needed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number235958
JournalJournal of Drug and Alcohol Research
Volume4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

Fingerprint

Reward
Self Stimulation
Brain
Therapeutics
Cocaine
modafinil
Aptitude
Sprague Dawley Rats

Keywords

  • Abuse liability
  • Cocaine
  • Intracranial self-stimulation
  • Modafinil
  • Psychostimulant
  • R-modafinil

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

Effects of modafinil and R-modafinil on brain stimulation reward thresholds : Implications for their use in the treatment of psychostimulant dependence. / Burrows, Brian T.; Watterson, Lucas R.; Johnson, Meagan A.; Olive, Michael.

In: Journal of Drug and Alcohol Research, Vol. 4, 235958, 01.01.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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