Effects of maternal and provider characteristics on up-to-date immunization status of children aged 19 to 35 months

Sam S. Kim, Jemima A. Frimpong, Patrick A. Rivers, Jennie J. Kronenfeld

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

47 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives. We examined the effects of maternal and provider characteristics on the up-to-date immunization status of children. Methods. We used data from the 2003 National Immunization Survey to determine variations in children's up-to-date status in the 4:3:1:3 immunization series. Results. Low maternal educational levels and low socioeconomic status were associated with high 4:3:1:3 series completion rates. Also, completion rates were high in Hispanic and non-Hispanic Black families with low income-to-poverty ratios. Conclusions. We found that children of less educated mothers and children in Hispanic and non-Hispanic Black families with low income-to-poverty ratios were more likely to have completed the 4:3:1:3 series. Although the reasons for these results need further exploration in other data sets, possible factors are Hispanics' positive cultural attitudes regarding the needs and importance of young children and provision of information on immunizations to low-income minority mothers who access government-subsidized health care programs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)259-266
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Public Health
Volume97
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2007

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Immunization
Mothers
Hispanic Americans
Poverty
Social Class
Delivery of Health Care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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Effects of maternal and provider characteristics on up-to-date immunization status of children aged 19 to 35 months. / Kim, Sam S.; Frimpong, Jemima A.; Rivers, Patrick A.; Kronenfeld, Jennie J.

In: American Journal of Public Health, Vol. 97, No. 2, 02.2007, p. 259-266.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kim, Sam S. ; Frimpong, Jemima A. ; Rivers, Patrick A. ; Kronenfeld, Jennie J. / Effects of maternal and provider characteristics on up-to-date immunization status of children aged 19 to 35 months. In: American Journal of Public Health. 2007 ; Vol. 97, No. 2. pp. 259-266.
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