Effects of lateral stepping gait and dual tasking during treadmill walking in healthy young and older adults

Rahul Soangra, Thurmon Lockhart

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Previous studies on lateral stepping gait have demonstrated decreased variability and also decreased involvement of central nervous system’s active control in the direction of progression. This study sought to further explore this notion through the variability of stride interval time series (SIT) and signal magnitude difference time series (SMD) while forward and lateral walking using an inertial sensor mounted at the sternum. Additionally, this study also explored the effects of dual-tasking on forward and lateral walking variability. Seven young (age 22.6±2.5 years) and seven old participants (age 71.14±6.5 years) were recruited for this study. Participants performed forward and lateral walking on treadmill at their preferred speed with and without dual tasking. The dual task provided was a mental arithmetic task (counting backwards from a random provided number by subtracting the number three). It was found that complexity of stride interval time series decreased significantly during lateral walking in both young and older adults (p=0.01). It was also found lateral walking affected both young and elderly and the complexity of signal magnitude differences in angular velocity signals reduced (p=0.01) than that at forward walking. The authors also found significant interaction effects in complexity of SMD signals between direction of progression and age groups. Furthermore, it was also found that dual-tasking affected both forward and lateral walking and both age groups by decreasing fractal properties in SMD (p=0.02). This study explored the complexity (approximate entropy and multiscale entropy) of temporal structure of movement as well as magnitudes of angular velocities and found that there is loss of complexity in both young and older adults due to lateral walking. The authors also found dual-tasking induced anti-persistence in angular velocities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication54th Annual Rocky Mountain Bioengineering Symposium, RMBS 2017 and 54th International ISA Biomedical Sciences Instrumentation Symposium 2017
PublisherInternational Society of Automation (ISA)
Volume2017-March
ISBN (Electronic)9781945541193
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017
Event54th Annual Rocky Mountain Bioengineering Symposium, RMBS 2017 and 54th International ISA Biomedical Sciences Instrumentation Symposium 2017 - Denver, United States
Duration: Mar 31 2017Apr 1 2017

Other

Other54th Annual Rocky Mountain Bioengineering Symposium, RMBS 2017 and 54th International ISA Biomedical Sciences Instrumentation Symposium 2017
CountryUnited States
CityDenver
Period3/31/174/1/17

Fingerprint

treadmills
gait
Exercise equipment
walking
Surface mount technology
Angular velocity
Gait
Walking
Young Adult
Time series
Entropy
angular velocity
Neurology
Fractals
progressions
sternum
Age Groups
Sensors
entropy
intervals

Keywords

  • Attention
  • Dual task
  • Fall risk
  • Inertial sensors
  • Lateral stepping gait

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Bioengineering
  • Instrumentation
  • Biotechnology
  • Biomedical Engineering

Cite this

Soangra, R., & Lockhart, T. (2017). Effects of lateral stepping gait and dual tasking during treadmill walking in healthy young and older adults. In 54th Annual Rocky Mountain Bioengineering Symposium, RMBS 2017 and 54th International ISA Biomedical Sciences Instrumentation Symposium 2017 (Vol. 2017-March). International Society of Automation (ISA).

Effects of lateral stepping gait and dual tasking during treadmill walking in healthy young and older adults. / Soangra, Rahul; Lockhart, Thurmon.

54th Annual Rocky Mountain Bioengineering Symposium, RMBS 2017 and 54th International ISA Biomedical Sciences Instrumentation Symposium 2017. Vol. 2017-March International Society of Automation (ISA), 2017.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Soangra, R & Lockhart, T 2017, Effects of lateral stepping gait and dual tasking during treadmill walking in healthy young and older adults. in 54th Annual Rocky Mountain Bioengineering Symposium, RMBS 2017 and 54th International ISA Biomedical Sciences Instrumentation Symposium 2017. vol. 2017-March, International Society of Automation (ISA), 54th Annual Rocky Mountain Bioengineering Symposium, RMBS 2017 and 54th International ISA Biomedical Sciences Instrumentation Symposium 2017, Denver, United States, 3/31/17.
Soangra R, Lockhart T. Effects of lateral stepping gait and dual tasking during treadmill walking in healthy young and older adults. In 54th Annual Rocky Mountain Bioengineering Symposium, RMBS 2017 and 54th International ISA Biomedical Sciences Instrumentation Symposium 2017. Vol. 2017-March. International Society of Automation (ISA). 2017
Soangra, Rahul ; Lockhart, Thurmon. / Effects of lateral stepping gait and dual tasking during treadmill walking in healthy young and older adults. 54th Annual Rocky Mountain Bioengineering Symposium, RMBS 2017 and 54th International ISA Biomedical Sciences Instrumentation Symposium 2017. Vol. 2017-March International Society of Automation (ISA), 2017.
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