Effects of individual differences on the performance of hierarchical decision-making teams

Much more than g

Jeffery LePine, John R. Hollenbeck, Daniel R. Ilgen, Jennifer Hedlund

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

184 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The authors propose (a) that team members' general cognitive ability (g) and conscientiousness are key resources for hierarchical decision-making teams with distributed expertise; (b) that a conjunctive model is most appropriate for capturing staff members' standing on these attributes; and (c) that in addition to main effects, staff attributes interact with those of the leader to determine team performance. Results from a study of 51 four-person teams performing a computerized decision-making task show that decision accuracy was highest when both the leader and staff (defined conjunctively) were high on g and conscientiousness. Post hoc analyses suggest reactions to the weakest member differed depending on whether the member was low in g or conscientiousness. Low-g members were helped, whereas low-conscientiousness members were ignored.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)803-811
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Applied Psychology
Volume82
Issue number5
StatePublished - Oct 1997
Externally publishedYes

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Individuality
Decision Making
Aptitude

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology

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Effects of individual differences on the performance of hierarchical decision-making teams : Much more than g. / LePine, Jeffery; Hollenbeck, John R.; Ilgen, Daniel R.; Hedlund, Jennifer.

In: Journal of Applied Psychology, Vol. 82, No. 5, 10.1997, p. 803-811.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

LePine, Jeffery ; Hollenbeck, John R. ; Ilgen, Daniel R. ; Hedlund, Jennifer. / Effects of individual differences on the performance of hierarchical decision-making teams : Much more than g. In: Journal of Applied Psychology. 1997 ; Vol. 82, No. 5. pp. 803-811.
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