Effects of individual differences on the performance of hierarchical decision-making teams: Much more than g

Jeffrey A. LePine, John R. Hollenbeck, Daniel R. Ilgen, Jennifer Hedlund

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

193 Scopus citations

Abstract

The authors propose (a) that team members' general cognitive ability (g) and conscientiousness are key resources for hierarchical decision-making teams with distributed expertise; (b) that a conjunctive model is most appropriate for capturing staff members' standing on these attributes; and (c) that in addition to main effects, staff attributes interact with those of the leader to determine team performance. Results from a study of 51 four-person teams performing a computerized decision-making task show that decision accuracy was highest when both the leader and staff (defined conjunctively) were high on g and conscientiousness. Post hoc analyses suggest reactions to the weakest member differed depending on whether the member was low in g or conscientiousness. Low-g members were helped, whereas low-conscientiousness members were ignored.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)803-811
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Applied Psychology
Volume82
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1997
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Effects of individual differences on the performance of hierarchical decision-making teams: Much more than g'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this