Effects of Individual Differences and Job Search Behaviors on the Employment Status of Recent University Graduates

Alan M. Saks, Blake E. Ashforth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

136 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examined the effects of individual difference variables (self-esteem, job search self-efficacy, and perceived control over job search outcomes) and job search behaviors (preparatory and active job search behavior, and job search intensity) on the employment status of recent university graduates at the time of graduation and 4 months later. The results indicate that only job search self-efficacy predicted the three job search behaviors. Job search self-efficacy also predicted employment status at graduation, and perceived control predicted employment status at both time periods. Active job search behavior and job search intensity predicted employment status at graduation, and preparatory job search behavior predicted employment status 4 months after graduation. Implications for the design and measurement of future job search research are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)335-349
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Vocational Behavior
Volume54
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 1999
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Applied Psychology
  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

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