Effects of Individual Differences and Job Search Behaviors on the Employment Status of Recent University Graduates

Alan M. Saks, Blake Ashforth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

127 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined the effects of individual difference variables (self-esteem, job search self-efficacy, and perceived control over job search outcomes) and job search behaviors (preparatory and active job search behavior, and job search intensity) on the employment status of recent university graduates at the time of graduation and 4 months later. The results indicate that only job search self-efficacy predicted the three job search behaviors. Job search self-efficacy also predicted employment status at graduation, and perceived control predicted employment status at both time periods. Active job search behavior and job search intensity predicted employment status at graduation, and preparatory job search behavior predicted employment status 4 months after graduation. Implications for the design and measurement of future job search research are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)335-349
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Vocational Behavior
Volume54
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1999
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

job search
Individuality
Self Efficacy
self-efficacy
Self Concept
Employment status
Individual differences
Job search
Job search behavior
employment behavior
Research
Graduation
self-esteem

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management
  • Applied Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Effects of Individual Differences and Job Search Behaviors on the Employment Status of Recent University Graduates. / Saks, Alan M.; Ashforth, Blake.

In: Journal of Vocational Behavior, Vol. 54, No. 2, 04.1999, p. 335-349.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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