Effects of deep brain stimulation on dynamic posture shifts in Parkinson's disease

Narayanan Krishnamurthi, Stefani Mulligan, Padma Mahant, Johan Samanta, James Abbas

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is now widely used to alleviate symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD). The long-term goal is to develop a quantitative tool to facilitate selection of DBS settings in the clinic since the typical parameter selection process may not adequately consider the effects of DBS on posture control. The aim of this study was to characterize the effects of changing the stimulation amplitude of DBS on posture control in PD. A dynamic posture shift paradigm involving target acquisition was used to assess posture control in 4 PD STN-DBS subjects. Each subject was tested at 4 stimulation amplitude settings: Clinically-determined (CD) settings, moderate (approx. 70% CD), low (approx. 30% CD), and off (no stimulation). Movements of the center of pressure and the position of the pelvis were monitored and several quantitative indices were calculated. The most substantial change was reductions in the peak velocity and the average movement velocity during the initial and mid phases of movement towards the target posture. These results may be explained in terms of increased akinesia and bradykinesia in the altered stimulation conditions. Thus, the dynamic posture shift paradigm can reveal changes in posture control capabilities, as evidenced by changes in movement velocity, due to alterations in DBS stimulation settings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2009 ICME International Conference on Complex Medical Engineering, CME 2009
DOIs
StatePublished - 2009
Event2009 ICME International Conference on Complex Medical Engineering, CME 2009 - Tempe, AZ, United States
Duration: Apr 9 2009Apr 11 2009

Other

Other2009 ICME International Conference on Complex Medical Engineering, CME 2009
CountryUnited States
CityTempe, AZ
Period4/9/094/11/09

Fingerprint

Deep Brain Stimulation
Posture
Parkinson Disease
Brain
Subthalamic Nucleus
Hypokinesia
Pelvis
Pressure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Health Informatics

Cite this

Krishnamurthi, N., Mulligan, S., Mahant, P., Samanta, J., & Abbas, J. (2009). Effects of deep brain stimulation on dynamic posture shifts in Parkinson's disease. In 2009 ICME International Conference on Complex Medical Engineering, CME 2009 [4906651] https://doi.org/10.1109/ICCME.2009.4906651

Effects of deep brain stimulation on dynamic posture shifts in Parkinson's disease. / Krishnamurthi, Narayanan; Mulligan, Stefani; Mahant, Padma; Samanta, Johan; Abbas, James.

2009 ICME International Conference on Complex Medical Engineering, CME 2009. 2009. 4906651.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Krishnamurthi, N, Mulligan, S, Mahant, P, Samanta, J & Abbas, J 2009, Effects of deep brain stimulation on dynamic posture shifts in Parkinson's disease. in 2009 ICME International Conference on Complex Medical Engineering, CME 2009., 4906651, 2009 ICME International Conference on Complex Medical Engineering, CME 2009, Tempe, AZ, United States, 4/9/09. https://doi.org/10.1109/ICCME.2009.4906651
Krishnamurthi N, Mulligan S, Mahant P, Samanta J, Abbas J. Effects of deep brain stimulation on dynamic posture shifts in Parkinson's disease. In 2009 ICME International Conference on Complex Medical Engineering, CME 2009. 2009. 4906651 https://doi.org/10.1109/ICCME.2009.4906651
Krishnamurthi, Narayanan ; Mulligan, Stefani ; Mahant, Padma ; Samanta, Johan ; Abbas, James. / Effects of deep brain stimulation on dynamic posture shifts in Parkinson's disease. 2009 ICME International Conference on Complex Medical Engineering, CME 2009. 2009.
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