Effects of commercial parking lots on the size of six southwest landscape trees

Sarah B. Celestian, Chris Martin

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Landscape trees are planted in commercial parking lot medians to provide shade as well as to enhance landscape environmental aesthetics. However, expansive areas of asphalt and concrete surfaces surrounding parking lot medians might expose parking lot trees to high temperatures that reduce tree growth and aesthetic potential. We studied the effect of commercial parking lots on the size of established trees of Brachychiton populneus Schott & Endl., Fraxinus velutina Torr., Pinus canariensis Sweet ex K Spreng, Pinus halepensis Mill., Prosopis chilensis (Molina) Stuntz, and Ulmus parvifolia Jacq., in Phoenix, AZ, USA. During Summer 2001, tree size and temperatures of ground surfaces under and near tree canopies were evaluated in parking lot medians and adjacent perimeter landscape beds at 15 commercial parking lots. For all taxa, mean canopy volume, height, and diameter at breast height were reduced by 64, 32, and 37%, respectively, compared with trees of the same taxa in adjacent perimeter landscape bed. Overall, size of P. halepensis and U. parvifolia was most negatively affected by parking lot medians, while size of P. chilensis was least affected by parking lot medians. Average mid-day summer temperatures of asphalt surfaces under and near tree canopies in parking lot medians approached 60oC (140oF) and were as much as 27oC (49oF) higher than surface temperatures of vegetated and non-vegetated surfaces in adjacent perimeter landscape beds.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationActa Horticulturae
Pages125-129
Number of pages5
Volume618
StatePublished - 2003

Publication series

NameActa Horticulturae
Volume618
ISSN (Print)05677572

Fingerprint

Ulmus parvifolia
Prosopis chilensis
bitumen
Pinus halepensis
aesthetics
canopy
Brachychiton
Fraxinus velutina
Pinus canariensis
temperature
summer
tree and stand measurements
tree growth
surface temperature
shade

Keywords

  • Asphalt
  • Canopy volume
  • Growth
  • Heat stress
  • Temperature

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Horticulture

Cite this

Celestian, S. B., & Martin, C. (2003). Effects of commercial parking lots on the size of six southwest landscape trees. In Acta Horticulturae (Vol. 618, pp. 125-129). (Acta Horticulturae; Vol. 618).

Effects of commercial parking lots on the size of six southwest landscape trees. / Celestian, Sarah B.; Martin, Chris.

Acta Horticulturae. Vol. 618 2003. p. 125-129 (Acta Horticulturae; Vol. 618).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Celestian, SB & Martin, C 2003, Effects of commercial parking lots on the size of six southwest landscape trees. in Acta Horticulturae. vol. 618, Acta Horticulturae, vol. 618, pp. 125-129.
Celestian SB, Martin C. Effects of commercial parking lots on the size of six southwest landscape trees. In Acta Horticulturae. Vol. 618. 2003. p. 125-129. (Acta Horticulturae).
Celestian, Sarah B. ; Martin, Chris. / Effects of commercial parking lots on the size of six southwest landscape trees. Acta Horticulturae. Vol. 618 2003. pp. 125-129 (Acta Horticulturae).
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