Effects of a Community-Based Diabetes Prevention Program for Latino Youth with Obesity: A Randomized Controlled Trial

Erica G. Soltero, Micah L. Olson, Allison N. Williams, Yolanda P. Konopken, Felipe Castro, Kimberly J. Arcoleo, Colleen S. Keller, Donald L. Patrick, Stephanie L. Ayers, Estela Barraza, Gabriel Shaibi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: This study examined the short- and long-term effects of a community-based lifestyle intervention among Latino youth with obesity. Methods: Latino adolescents (14-16 years old) were randomized to a 3-month lifestyle intervention (n = 67) or comparison control (n = 69) and followed for 12 months. The intervention included weekly nutrition and health classes delivered to groups of families and exercise sessions (3 days/week) delivered to groups of adolescents. Comparison youth received laboratory results and general health information. Primary outcomes included insulin sensitivity and weight-specific quality of life (QoL) with secondary outcomes of BMI percentile (BMI%), waist circumference, and percent body fat. Results: At 3 months, youth in the intervention group exhibited significant increases in insulin sensitivity (P < 0.05) and weight-specific QoL (P < 0.001), as well as reductions in BMI%, waist circumference, and percent body fat compared with controls. Increases in weight-specific QoL and reductions in BMI% and percent body fat remained significant at 12 months (P < 0.001), while changes in insulin sensitivity did not. In a subsample of youth with prediabetes at baseline, insulin sensitivity (P = 0.01), weight-specific QoL (P < 0.001), and BMI% (P < 0.001) significantly improved at 3 months. Conclusions: Lifestyle intervention can improve cardiometabolic and psychosocial health in a vulnerable population of Latino adolescents at high risk for developing type 2 diabetes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1856-1865
Number of pages10
JournalObesity
Volume26
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2018

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Endocrinology
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

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