Effects of a Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Intervention Trial to Improve Disease Outcomes in Children with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

Rona L. Levy, Miranda A L Van Tilburg, Shelby Langer, Joan M. Romano, Lynn S. Walker, Lloyd A. Mancl, Tasha B. Murphy, Robyn L. Claar, Shara I. Feld, Dennis L. Christie, Bisher Abdullah, Melissa M. DuPen, Kimberly S. Swanson, Melissa D. Baker, Susan A. Stoner, William E. Whitehead

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Studies testing the efficacy of behavioral interventions to modify psychosocial sequelae of inflammatory bowel disease in children are limited. This report presents outcomes through a 6-month follow-up from a large randomized controlled trial testing the efficacy of a cognitive behavioral intervention for children with inflammatory bowel disease and their parents. Methods: One hundred eighty-five children aged 8 to 17 years with a diagnosis of Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis and their parents were randomized to one of two 3-session conditions: (1) a social learning and cognitive behavioral therapy condition or (2) an education support condition designed to control for time and attention. Results: There was a significant overall treatment effect for school absences due to Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis (P < 0.05) at 6 months after treatment. There was also a significant overall effect after treatment for child-reported quality of life (P < 0.05), parent-reported increases in adaptive child coping (P < 0.001), and reductions in parents' maladaptive responses to children's symptoms (P < 0.05). Finally, exploratory analyses indicated that for children with a higher level of flares (2 or more) prebaseline, those in social learning and cognitive behavioral therapy condition experienced a greater reduction in flares after treatment. Conclusions: This trial suggests that a brief cognitive behavioral intervention for children with inflammatory bowel disease and their parents can result in improved child functioning and quality of life, and for some children may decrease disease activity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2134-2148
Number of pages15
JournalInflammatory Bowel Diseases
Volume22
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 10 2016
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Cognitive Therapy
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases
Parents
Ulcerative Colitis
Crohn Disease
Quality of Life
Therapeutics
Randomized Controlled Trials
Education

Keywords

  • Crohn's disease
  • inflammatory bowel disease
  • pediatric gastroenterology
  • quality of life
  • ulcerative colitis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Medicine(all)
  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Effects of a Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Intervention Trial to Improve Disease Outcomes in Children with Inflammatory Bowel Disease. / Levy, Rona L.; Van Tilburg, Miranda A L; Langer, Shelby; Romano, Joan M.; Walker, Lynn S.; Mancl, Lloyd A.; Murphy, Tasha B.; Claar, Robyn L.; Feld, Shara I.; Christie, Dennis L.; Abdullah, Bisher; DuPen, Melissa M.; Swanson, Kimberly S.; Baker, Melissa D.; Stoner, Susan A.; Whitehead, William E.

In: Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, Vol. 22, No. 9, 10.08.2016, p. 2134-2148.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Levy, RL, Van Tilburg, MAL, Langer, S, Romano, JM, Walker, LS, Mancl, LA, Murphy, TB, Claar, RL, Feld, SI, Christie, DL, Abdullah, B, DuPen, MM, Swanson, KS, Baker, MD, Stoner, SA & Whitehead, WE 2016, 'Effects of a Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Intervention Trial to Improve Disease Outcomes in Children with Inflammatory Bowel Disease', Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, vol. 22, no. 9, pp. 2134-2148. https://doi.org/10.1097/MIB.0000000000000881
Levy, Rona L. ; Van Tilburg, Miranda A L ; Langer, Shelby ; Romano, Joan M. ; Walker, Lynn S. ; Mancl, Lloyd A. ; Murphy, Tasha B. ; Claar, Robyn L. ; Feld, Shara I. ; Christie, Dennis L. ; Abdullah, Bisher ; DuPen, Melissa M. ; Swanson, Kimberly S. ; Baker, Melissa D. ; Stoner, Susan A. ; Whitehead, William E. / Effects of a Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Intervention Trial to Improve Disease Outcomes in Children with Inflammatory Bowel Disease. In: Inflammatory Bowel Diseases. 2016 ; Vol. 22, No. 9. pp. 2134-2148.
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