Effectiveness of social science research opportunities: a study of course-based undergraduate research experiences (CUREs)

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Undergraduate research experiences (UREs) can improve student skills, retention, and matriculation to postgraduate study. Traditionally, UREs are available mostly in the natural and biological sciences, which have fewer minority and women majors and thus have disproportionately excluded these groups from such experiences. One effective solution is to diversify and increase course-based undergraduate research experiences (CUREs) within the social sciences. Models are few and research is limited on the impacts of parallel social science research experiences, but both are crucial to the goals of diversifying postgraduate success. Using a survey, we retrospectively assessed, qualitatively and quantitatively, past students’ (n = 87) career and personal learning impacts and outcomes in social science CUREs. These courses led to perceived improvements in understanding research processes and ethics, self-confidence, perseverance, and collaboration. Comparing to data from natural sciences, overall impacts were similar, including the intention to complete postgraduate education among first-generation students.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalTeaching in Higher Education
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021

Keywords

  • anthropology
  • CURES
  • experiential education
  • Experiential learning
  • first-generation students
  • post-graduate education
  • undergraduate research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Effectiveness of social science research opportunities: a study of course-based undergraduate research experiences (CUREs)'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this