Effective Messaging on Social Media: What Makes Online Content Go Viral?

Maryam Mousavi, Hasan Davulcu, Mohsen Ahmadi, Robert Axelrod, Richard Davis, Scott Atran

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

In this paper, we propose and test three content-based hypotheses that significantly increase message virality. We measure virality as the retweet counts of messages in a pair of real-world Twitter datasets A large dataset - UK Brexit with 51 million tweets from 2.8 million users between June 1, 2015 and May 12, 2019 and a smaller dataset - Nord Stream 2 with 516,000 tweets from 250,000 users between October 1, 2019 and October 15, 2019. We hypothesize, test and conclude that messages incorporating "negativity bias", "causal arguments"and "threats to personal or societal core values of target audiences"singularly and jointly increase message virality on social media.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationWWW 2022 - Proceedings of the ACM Web Conference 2022
PublisherAssociation for Computing Machinery, Inc
Pages2957-2966
Number of pages10
ISBN (Electronic)9781450390965
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 25 2022
Externally publishedYes
Event31st ACM World Wide Web Conference, WWW 2022 - Virtual, Online, France
Duration: Apr 25 2022Apr 29 2022

Publication series

NameWWW 2022 - Proceedings of the ACM Web Conference 2022

Conference

Conference31st ACM World Wide Web Conference, WWW 2022
Country/TerritoryFrance
CityVirtual, Online
Period4/25/224/29/22

Keywords

  • Causal Arguments
  • Core Values
  • Message Effectiveness
  • Message Virality
  • Negativity Bias

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Networks and Communications
  • Software

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