Effect of titania surface species on the chemisorption of CO and H2 on polycrystalline nickel

Gregory Raupp, J. A. Dumesic

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

66 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A submonolayer amount of titanium was deposited and subsequently oxidized in situ on a clean polycrystalline nickel foil in ultrahigh vacuum. Temperature-programmed desorption revealed the activation energy for CO desorption was reduced significantly by the presence of titania surface species. The titania-containing Ni surface showed three binding states for dissociative hydrogen adsorption. Adsorption into the strongest of these three states was an activated process. These results suggest the apparent suppression of CO and H2 adsorption typically observed at 300 K for titania-supported group 8 metals may be due to the existence of titania species on the surfaces of the metal particles.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)660-663
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Physical Chemistry
Volume88
Issue number4
StatePublished - 1984
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Carbon Monoxide
Chemisorption
Nickel
chemisorption
titanium
Titanium
nickel
Adsorption
Metals
adsorption
desorption
Ultrahigh vacuum
Temperature programmed desorption
Metal foil
metal particles
Hydrogen
Desorption
Activation energy
ultrahigh vacuum
foils

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry

Cite this

Effect of titania surface species on the chemisorption of CO and H2 on polycrystalline nickel. / Raupp, Gregory; Dumesic, J. A.

In: Journal of Physical Chemistry, Vol. 88, No. 4, 1984, p. 660-663.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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