Effect of medical Qigong on cognitive function, quality of life, and a biomarker of inflammation in cancer patients

A randomized controlled trial

Byeongsang Oh, Phyllis N. Butow, Barbara A. Mullan, Stephen J. Clarke, Philip J. Beale, Nick Pavlakis, Myeong Soo Lee, David S. Rosenthal, Linda Larkey, Janette Vardy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

100 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: Cancer patients often experience diminished cognitive function (CF) and quality of life (QOL) due to the side effects of treatment and the disease symptoms. This study evaluates the effects of medical Qigong (MQ; combination of gentle exercise and meditation) on CF, QOL, and inflammation in cancer patients. Methods: Eighty-one cancer patients recruited between October 2007 and May 2008 were randomly assigned to two groups: a control group (n=44) who received the usual health care and an intervention group (n=37) who participated in a 10-week MQ program. Self-reported CF was measured by the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC-CF) and the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy - Cognitive (FACT-Cog). The Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy - General (FACT-G) was used to measure QOL. C-reactive protein (CRP) was assessed as a biomarker of inflammation. Results: The MQ group self-reported significantly improved CF (mean difference (MD)=7.78, t 51=-2.532, p=0.014) in the EORTC-CF and all the FACT-Cog subscales [perceived cognitive impairment (MD=4.70, t 43=-2.254, p=0.029), impact of perceived cognitive impairment on QOL (MD=1.64, t 45=-2.377, p=0.024), and perceived cognitive abilities (MD=3.61, t 45=-2.229, p=0.031)] compared to controls. The MQ group also reported significantly improved QOL (MD=12.66, t 45=-5.715, p<0.001) and had reduced CRP levels (MD=-0.72, t 45=2.092, p=0.042) compared to controls. Conclusions: Results suggest that MQ benefits cancer patients' self-reported CF, QOL, and inflammation. A larger randomized controlled trial including an objective assessment of CF is planned.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1235-1242
Number of pages8
JournalSupportive Care in Cancer
Volume20
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2012

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Qigong
Cognition
Randomized Controlled Trials
Biomarkers
Quality of Life
Inflammation
Neoplasms
Cognitive Therapy
C-Reactive Protein
Meditation
Aptitude
Therapeutics
Organizations
Exercise
Delivery of Health Care

Keywords

  • Cancer
  • Cognitive function
  • Inflammation
  • Medical Qigong
  • Quality of life

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology

Cite this

Effect of medical Qigong on cognitive function, quality of life, and a biomarker of inflammation in cancer patients : A randomized controlled trial. / Oh, Byeongsang; Butow, Phyllis N.; Mullan, Barbara A.; Clarke, Stephen J.; Beale, Philip J.; Pavlakis, Nick; Lee, Myeong Soo; Rosenthal, David S.; Larkey, Linda; Vardy, Janette.

In: Supportive Care in Cancer, Vol. 20, No. 6, 06.2012, p. 1235-1242.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Oh, Byeongsang ; Butow, Phyllis N. ; Mullan, Barbara A. ; Clarke, Stephen J. ; Beale, Philip J. ; Pavlakis, Nick ; Lee, Myeong Soo ; Rosenthal, David S. ; Larkey, Linda ; Vardy, Janette. / Effect of medical Qigong on cognitive function, quality of life, and a biomarker of inflammation in cancer patients : A randomized controlled trial. In: Supportive Care in Cancer. 2012 ; Vol. 20, No. 6. pp. 1235-1242.
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abstract = "Purpose: Cancer patients often experience diminished cognitive function (CF) and quality of life (QOL) due to the side effects of treatment and the disease symptoms. This study evaluates the effects of medical Qigong (MQ; combination of gentle exercise and meditation) on CF, QOL, and inflammation in cancer patients. Methods: Eighty-one cancer patients recruited between October 2007 and May 2008 were randomly assigned to two groups: a control group (n=44) who received the usual health care and an intervention group (n=37) who participated in a 10-week MQ program. Self-reported CF was measured by the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC-CF) and the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy - Cognitive (FACT-Cog). The Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy - General (FACT-G) was used to measure QOL. C-reactive protein (CRP) was assessed as a biomarker of inflammation. Results: The MQ group self-reported significantly improved CF (mean difference (MD)=7.78, t 51=-2.532, p=0.014) in the EORTC-CF and all the FACT-Cog subscales [perceived cognitive impairment (MD=4.70, t 43=-2.254, p=0.029), impact of perceived cognitive impairment on QOL (MD=1.64, t 45=-2.377, p=0.024), and perceived cognitive abilities (MD=3.61, t 45=-2.229, p=0.031)] compared to controls. The MQ group also reported significantly improved QOL (MD=12.66, t 45=-5.715, p<0.001) and had reduced CRP levels (MD=-0.72, t 45=2.092, p=0.042) compared to controls. Conclusions: Results suggest that MQ benefits cancer patients' self-reported CF, QOL, and inflammation. A larger randomized controlled trial including an objective assessment of CF is planned.",
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T2 - A randomized controlled trial

AU - Oh, Byeongsang

AU - Butow, Phyllis N.

AU - Mullan, Barbara A.

AU - Clarke, Stephen J.

AU - Beale, Philip J.

AU - Pavlakis, Nick

AU - Lee, Myeong Soo

AU - Rosenthal, David S.

AU - Larkey, Linda

AU - Vardy, Janette

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N2 - Purpose: Cancer patients often experience diminished cognitive function (CF) and quality of life (QOL) due to the side effects of treatment and the disease symptoms. This study evaluates the effects of medical Qigong (MQ; combination of gentle exercise and meditation) on CF, QOL, and inflammation in cancer patients. Methods: Eighty-one cancer patients recruited between October 2007 and May 2008 were randomly assigned to two groups: a control group (n=44) who received the usual health care and an intervention group (n=37) who participated in a 10-week MQ program. Self-reported CF was measured by the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC-CF) and the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy - Cognitive (FACT-Cog). The Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy - General (FACT-G) was used to measure QOL. C-reactive protein (CRP) was assessed as a biomarker of inflammation. Results: The MQ group self-reported significantly improved CF (mean difference (MD)=7.78, t 51=-2.532, p=0.014) in the EORTC-CF and all the FACT-Cog subscales [perceived cognitive impairment (MD=4.70, t 43=-2.254, p=0.029), impact of perceived cognitive impairment on QOL (MD=1.64, t 45=-2.377, p=0.024), and perceived cognitive abilities (MD=3.61, t 45=-2.229, p=0.031)] compared to controls. The MQ group also reported significantly improved QOL (MD=12.66, t 45=-5.715, p<0.001) and had reduced CRP levels (MD=-0.72, t 45=2.092, p=0.042) compared to controls. Conclusions: Results suggest that MQ benefits cancer patients' self-reported CF, QOL, and inflammation. A larger randomized controlled trial including an objective assessment of CF is planned.

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