Effect of fiber material on ozone removal and carbonyl production from carpets

Omed A. Abbass, David Sailor, Elliott T. Gall

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Indoor air quality is affected by indoor materials such as carpets that may act as sources and/or sinks of gas-phase air pollutants. Heterogeneous reactions of ozone with carpets may result in potentially harmful products. In this study, indoor residential carpets of varying fiber types were tested to evaluate their ability to remove ozone, and to assess their role in the production of carbonyls when exposed to elevated levels of ozone. Tests were conducted with six types of new unused carpets. Two sets of experiments were conducted, the first measured ozone removal and ozone deposition velocities, and the second measured primary carbonyl production and secondary production as a result of exposure to ozone. The tests were conducted using glass chambers with volume of 52 L each. Air exchange rates for all tests were 3 h−1. The ozone removal tests show that, for the conditions tested, the polyester carpet sample had the lowest ozone removal (40%), while wool carpet had the greatest ozone removal (65%). Most carpet samples showed higher secondary than primary carbonyl emissions, with carpets containing polypropylene fibers being a notable exception. Carpets with polyester fibers had both the highest primary and secondary emissions of formaldehyde among all samples tested. While it is difficult to make blanket conclusions about the relative air quality merits of various carpet fiber options, it is clear that ozone removal percentages and emissions of volatile organic compounds can vary drastically as a function of fiber type.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)42-48
Number of pages7
JournalAtmospheric Environment
Volume148
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

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ozone
air quality
effect
material
fibre
removal
deposition velocity
secondary production
wool
indoor air
exchange rate
formaldehyde
volatile organic compound
glass
test
air
gas
experiment

Keywords

  • Aldehydes
  • Formaldehyde
  • Indoor air quality
  • Measurements
  • Ozone deposition velocity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Atmospheric Science

Cite this

Effect of fiber material on ozone removal and carbonyl production from carpets. / Abbass, Omed A.; Sailor, David; Gall, Elliott T.

In: Atmospheric Environment, Vol. 148, 01.01.2017, p. 42-48.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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