Effect of collectivistic cultural imperatives on Asian American meta-stereotypes

Tracy Chu, Sau Kwan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The present study explored self-perceptions and meta-stereotypes along two dimensions, individuation and sociability, within a sample of Asian American and European American students. For both ethnic groups, meta-stereotypes in dimensions of individuation and sociability appear to be exaggerated forms of self-perceptions along these dimensions. Both Asian and European Americans distinguish between self-perceptions of sociability and individuation, showing that sociability and individuation are two independent constructs. Asian Americans, however, perceived that others who expect a certain level of sociability from their ethnic group would also expect the same level of individuation. Implications of these findings for the perpetuation of Asian stereotypes are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)270-276
Number of pages7
JournalAsian Journal of Social Psychology
Volume10
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2007
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Individuation
personality development
Asian Americans
sociability
stereotype
Self Concept
self-image
Ethnic Groups
ethnic group
Form Perception
Students
student

Keywords

  • Acculturation
  • Asian Americans
  • Culture
  • Individuation
  • Stereotype

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Social Psychology

Cite this

Effect of collectivistic cultural imperatives on Asian American meta-stereotypes. / Chu, Tracy; Kwan, Sau.

In: Asian Journal of Social Psychology, Vol. 10, No. 4, 12.2007, p. 270-276.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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