Economic vulnerability, discrimination, and hurricane Katrina: Health among black Katrina survivors in Eastern New Orleans

Angela Chen, Verna M. Keith, Chris Airriess, Wei Li, Karen Leong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Few works have viewed disaster relief in the context of socioeconomic disparity and racial inequality before Katrina. Objective: By using the vulnerable-populations conceptual framework, our study aimed to investigate the relationship among economic vulnerability, perceived discrimination, and health outcomes among 69 Black Katrina survivors in Eastern New Orleans. Study Design: A mixed-method approach, including survey and focus groups, was applied to collect data. Results: Our findings suggested that a higher level of perceived racial discrimination during Katrina and financial strain post-Katrina were associated with more posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms; support provided by network members served to enhance mental and physical health. Compared with Black males, female survivors reported more PTSD symptoms and worse mental health. Conclusions: It is imperative for nursing scholars and public policies to directly address the intricacies of race, class, and gender inequality to deliver interventions tailored to meet the unique needs of vulnerable populations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)257-266
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of the American Psychiatric Nurses Association
Volume13
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2007

Keywords

  • Black
  • Health-related quality of life
  • Posttraumatic stress disorder
  • Poverty
  • Racial discrimination

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Phychiatric Mental Health

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