Economic integration among developed, developing and centrally planned economies: a comparative analysis.

J. C. Brada, Jose Mendez

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

72 Scopus citations

Abstract

Examines six integration schemes, and decomposes their ability to increase inter-member trade into environmental, policy, and system effects. Environmental factors caused the greatest variation in trade creation, with inter-member distance the most important environmental variable. The CACM and EFTA; have followed more effective integration policies than the EEC, LAFTA, and the Andean Pact. Although integration can thus benefit developed and developing countries alike, for some, such as those in Latin America, inter-member distances severely limit its effectiveness. While the combination of policy and system has kept the CMEA from achieving its full potential for increasing inter-member trade, its effectiveness does not differ from that of unions among market economies. -Authors

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationReview of Economics & Statistics
Pages549-556
Number of pages8
Volume67
Edition4
StatePublished - 1985

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)
  • Environmental Science(all)

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    Brada, J. C., & Mendez, J. (1985). Economic integration among developed, developing and centrally planned economies: a comparative analysis. In Review of Economics & Statistics (4 ed., Vol. 67, pp. 549-556)