Early Subjective Response and Acquired Tolerance as Predictors of Alcohol Use and Related Problems in a Clinical Sample

William Corbin, Caitlin Scott, Robert F. Leeman, Lisa M. Fucito, Benjamin A. Toll, Stephanie S. O'Malley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Previous studies have demonstrated that a low subjective response (SR) to alcohol is a risk factor for alcohol use disorders (AUDs), and a recent study suggests that acquired tolerance can be differentiated from initial SR and is also significantly associated with drinking problems. Because the prior study of SR and tolerance focused on a sample of moderate drinkers, the goal of the current study was to examine relations between early SR, acquired tolerance, alcohol use, and alcohol-related problems in a sample of young adults with clinically significant alcohol problems. Methods: The current study examined associations between early SR and acquired tolerance and both drinking behavior and alcohol-related problems within a sample of 113 heavy drinking young adults (66.1% male) volunteering for a clinical trial of naltrexone in combination with brief motivational counseling. Results: Consistent with the 1 prior study examining simultaneous effects of early SR and tolerance, both early SR and acquired tolerance were positively associated with typical drinking behavior, although tolerance was a much stronger predictor within this clinical sample. In contrast to the prior study, early SR was inversely associated with risk for alcohol-related problems, and tolerance was not a significant predictor of problems. Conclusions: The results suggested that, controlling for weekly drinking, a low early SR protected against acute negative consequences within a sample of heavy drinkers who had acquired significant tolerance to alcohol effects. It is possible that this protective effect may eventually shift to a risk factor by allowing individuals with a low SR to persist in a pattern of hazardous drinking.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)490-497
Number of pages8
JournalAlcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research
Volume37
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2013

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Alcohols
Drinking
Drinking Behavior
Young Adult
Naltrexone
Counseling
Clinical Trials

Keywords

  • Alcohol Problems
  • Alcohol Use
  • Heavy Drinkers
  • Subjective Response
  • Tolerance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Toxicology

Cite this

Early Subjective Response and Acquired Tolerance as Predictors of Alcohol Use and Related Problems in a Clinical Sample. / Corbin, William; Scott, Caitlin; Leeman, Robert F.; Fucito, Lisa M.; Toll, Benjamin A.; O'Malley, Stephanie S.

In: Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, Vol. 37, No. 3, 03.2013, p. 490-497.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Corbin, William ; Scott, Caitlin ; Leeman, Robert F. ; Fucito, Lisa M. ; Toll, Benjamin A. ; O'Malley, Stephanie S. / Early Subjective Response and Acquired Tolerance as Predictors of Alcohol Use and Related Problems in a Clinical Sample. In: Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research. 2013 ; Vol. 37, No. 3. pp. 490-497.
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