Early speech and language development in children with velocardiofacial syndrome

Nancy J. Scherer, Linda L. D'Antonio, John H. Kalbfleisch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

88 Scopus citations

Abstract

Speech-language impairment is one of the most common clinical features in velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS). This report describes the speech and language development of four children with VCFS studied longitudinally from 6 to 30 months of age and compares their performance with three groups of children: (1) normally developing children, (2) children with cleft lip and palate, and (3) children with isolated cleft palate. The data show that young children with VCFS show a receptive-expressive language impairment from the onset of language. Further, speech and expressive language development were severely delayed beyond a level predicted by their other developmental or receptive language performance. The children with VCFS showed severe limitations in speech sound inventories and early vocabulary development that far exceeded those shown by the children with cleft lip and palate and children with isolated cleft palate. This study indicates that young children with VCFS emerge from a critical speech and language learning period with severe limitations in their communicative abilities. Further studies are required to describe the later course of these early speech and language impairments and to explore the relationship to learning disabilities described for older children with VCFS.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)714-723
Number of pages10
JournalAmerican Journal of Medical Genetics - Neuropsychiatric Genetics
Volume88
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 15 1999

Keywords

  • 22q11 deletion
  • Cleft palate
  • Speech-language impairment
  • Velocardiofacial syndrome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics(clinical)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

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