E-government and network technologies: Does bureaucratic red tape inhibit, promote or fall victim to intranet technology implementation?

Eric Welch, Sanjay Pandey

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

This paper examines the relationship between excessive bureaucratization and implementation of intranet technology in state health and human service agencies. Findings show that different structural, communication and cultural factors are important to the three stages to technological change examined: adoption, development, and reliance. Red tape is negatively associated with information quality at the development stage, while information quality is a contributor to the extent organizations rely on intranets. The identification of red tape as a "bottle neck" provides nuanced understanding of the role excessive bureaucratization plays in the process of technological change in public organizations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences
EditorsR.H. Spraque, Jr.
Pages122
Number of pages1
StatePublished - 2005
Externally publishedYes
Event38th Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences - Big Island, HI, United States
Duration: Jan 3 2005Jan 6 2005

Other

Other38th Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences
CountryUnited States
CityBig Island, HI
Period1/3/051/6/05

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

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  • Cite this

    Welch, E., & Pandey, S. (2005). E-government and network technologies: Does bureaucratic red tape inhibit, promote or fall victim to intranet technology implementation? In R. H. Spraque, Jr. (Ed.), Proceedings of the Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences (pp. 122)