Dynamic longitudinal relations among solitary drinking, coping motives, & alcohol problems during emerging adulthood

Jack T. Waddell, Scott E. King, William R. Corbin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Introduction: Solitary drinking (i.e., drinking alone) and coping drinking motives are risk factors for alcohol problems. Theoretical models suggest that solitary drinking and coping motives are highly related. However, the direction of effects between solitary drinking and coping motives is unclear. It also remains unclear if relations are present solely at the between-person level, or if there are also dynamic, within-person relations. Therefore, the current study tested dynamic, reciprocal relations among solitary drinking, coping motives, and alcohol problems using Random Intercept Cross Lagged Panel Modeling (RI-CLPM). Methods: Data came from a large alcohol administration study with longitudinal follow-ups over 2 years (N = 448). Participants completed a baseline session and then were followed up 6, 12, 18, and 24 months later. Participants reported their solitary drinking frequency, coping motives, drinking behavior, and alcohol problems at all assessments. Results: Person-level solitary drinking was related to person-level coping motives and alcohol problems, and person-level coping motives were related to person-level alcohol problems. There were also contemporaneous within-person effects, such that a within-person increase in solitary drinking was associated with a concurrent within-person increase in coping motives, and a within-person increase in coping motives was associated with a concurrent within-person increase in alcohol problems. There were no within-person prospective relations among any variables. Conclusions: Findings suggest strong between-person associations among solitary drinking, coping motives, and alcohol problems. Within-person associations were concurrent but not prospective. Targeting solitary and coping-motivated drinkers, as well within-person increases in both, may be effective at reducing risk for alcohol problems.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number109576
JournalDrug and alcohol dependence
Volume238
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2022

Keywords

  • Coping motives
  • Drinking alone
  • Negative consequences
  • Social-contextual theory
  • Solitary drinking

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Toxicology
  • Pharmacology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Pharmacology (medical)

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Dynamic longitudinal relations among solitary drinking, coping motives, & alcohol problems during emerging adulthood'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this