Abstract

Recent developments in the UN process intended to address anthropogenic climate change, including the conference of the parties in Durban, South Africa, have increased concerns about how successful current policy initiatives are liable to be. Change in the existing policy structure is, however, unlikely because of cultural lock-in, including the institutional and psychological commitments of many participants to the current process. Accordingly, there may be increased pressures to develop geoengineering technologies, intended to reduce anthropogenic climate change by either capturing atmospheric CO 2, or reducing solar insolation. These technologies are still nascent, however, and pose significant risk if deployed at scale prematurely.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2012 IEEE International Symposium on Sustainable Systems and Technology, ISSST 2012
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 19 2012
Event2012 IEEE International Symposium on Sustainable Systems and Technology, ISSST 2012 - Boston, MA, United States
Duration: May 16 2012May 18 2012

Publication series

NameIEEE International Symposium on Sustainable Systems and Technology
ISSN (Print)2157-524X
ISSN (Electronic)2157-5258

Other

Other2012 IEEE International Symposium on Sustainable Systems and Technology, ISSST 2012
CountryUnited States
CityBoston, MA
Period5/16/125/18/12

Keywords

  • Geoengineering
  • UNFCCC
  • climate change
  • cultural lock-in

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Information Systems
  • Control and Systems Engineering
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

Cite this

Allenby, B. (2012). Durban: Geoengineering as a response to cultural lock-in. In 2012 IEEE International Symposium on Sustainable Systems and Technology, ISSST 2012 [6228022] (IEEE International Symposium on Sustainable Systems and Technology). https://doi.org/10.1109/ISSST.2012.6228022