Dual-task interference and brain structural connectivity in people with Parkinson's disease who freeze

Daniel Peterson, Brett W. Fling, Martina Mancini, Rajal G. Cohen, John G. Nutt, Fay B. Horak

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Freezing of gait in people with Parkinson's disease (PD) is likely related to attentional control (ie, ability to divide and switch attention). However, the neural pathophysiology of altered attentional control in individuals with PD who freeze is unknown. Structural connectivity of the pedunculopontine nucleus has been related to freezing and may play a role in altered attentional control; however, this relationship has not been investigated. We measured whether dual-task interference, defined as the reduction in gait performance during dual-task walking, is more pronounced in individuals with PD who freeze, and whether dual-task interference is associated with structural connectivity and/or executive function in this population. Methods: We measured stride length in 13 people with PD with and 12 without freezing of gait during normal and dual-task walking. We also assessed asymmetry of pedunculopontine nucleus structural connectivity via diffusion tensor imaging and performance on cognitive tests assessing inhibition and set-shifting, cognitive domains related to freezing. Results: Although stride length was not different across groups, change in stride length between normal and dual-task gait (ie, dual-task interference) was more pronounced in people with PD who freeze compared to non-freezers. Further, in people with PD who freeze, dual-task interference was correlated with asymmetry of pedunculopontine nucleus structural connectivity, Go-NoGo target accuracy (ability to release a response) and simple reaction time. Conclusions: These results support the hypothesis that freezing is related to altered attentional control during gait, and suggest that differences in pedunculopontine nucleus connectivity contribute to poorer attentional control in people with PD who freeze.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)786-792
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry
Volume86
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2015
Externally publishedYes

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Parkinson Disease
Gait
Freezing
Brain
Aptitude
Walking
Diffusion Tensor Imaging
Executive Function
Reaction Time
Connectivity
Interference
Parkinson's Disease
Dual Task
Population
Nucleus
Length

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Surgery
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Dual-task interference and brain structural connectivity in people with Parkinson's disease who freeze. / Peterson, Daniel; Fling, Brett W.; Mancini, Martina; Cohen, Rajal G.; Nutt, John G.; Horak, Fay B.

In: Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry, Vol. 86, No. 7, 01.07.2015, p. 786-792.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Peterson, Daniel ; Fling, Brett W. ; Mancini, Martina ; Cohen, Rajal G. ; Nutt, John G. ; Horak, Fay B. / Dual-task interference and brain structural connectivity in people with Parkinson's disease who freeze. In: Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry. 2015 ; Vol. 86, No. 7. pp. 786-792.
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