Does the job matter? Comparing correlates of stress among treatment and correctional staff in prisons

Gaylene S. Armstrong, Marie L. Griffin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

143 Scopus citations

Abstract

The wealth of literature on stress in the correctional workplace focused on correctional officers, frequently ignoring treatment personnel employed in these same institutions. This study advanced the literature on correctional workplace stress by: (1) testing for differences in workplace stress between correctional officers and treatment personnel, (2) examining personal and environmental factors to determine whether distinct precursors to stress existed for these two groups, and (3) utilizing multiple measures of stress. Self-report survey data from 3,794 employees in ten adult prisons in a southwestern state demonstrated that both groups of employees reported moderately high levels of job stress and stress-related health concerns. Apart from perceptions of safety, sources of stress as well as protective factors against stress were similar for both groups with environmental factors demonstrating the most robust impact.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)577-592
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Criminal Justice
Volume32
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2004

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Applied Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Law

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