Does the ecological concept of disturbance have utility in urban social–ecological–technological systems?

Nancy Grimm, Steward T.A. Pickett, Rebecca L. Hale, Mary L. Cadenasso

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Scopus citations

Abstract

The ecological concept of disturbance has scarcely been applied in urban systems except in the erroneous but commonplace assumption that urbanization itself is a disturbance and cities are therefore perennially disturbed systems. We evaluate the usefulness of the concept in urban ecology by exploring how a recent conceptual framework for disturbance (Peters et al. 2011, Ecosphere, 2, art 81) applies to these social–ecological–technological systems (). Case studies, especially from the Long‐Term Ecological Research sites of Baltimore and Phoenix, are presented to show the applicability of the framework for disturbances to different elements of these systems at different scales. We find that the framework is easily adapted to urban and that incorporating social and technological drivers and responders can contribute additional insights to disturbance research beyond urban systems.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere01255
JournalEcosystem Health and Sustainability
Volume3
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

Keywords

  • cities
  • conceptual framework
  • disturbance
  • economic disruption
  • fire
  • flood
  • land conversion
  • legacy
  • model
  • social–ecological–technological systems
  • urban vegetation
  • urbanization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Ecology
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Does the ecological concept of disturbance have utility in urban social–ecological–technological systems?'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this