Does Teacher Self-Efficacy Predict Writing Practices of Teachers of Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students?

Steve Graham, Kimberly Wolbers, Hannah Dostal, Leala Holcomb

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Forty-four elementary grade teachers of deaf and hard of hearing students were surveyed about how they taught writing and their beliefs about writing. Beliefs about writing included their self-efficacy to teach writing, attitude toward writing, and epistemological beliefs about writing. These teachers from fifteen different states in the United States slightly agreed that they were efficacious writing teachers and they were slightly positive about their writing. They slightly agreed that learning to write involves effort and process, moderately disagreed that writing development is innate or fixed, slightly disagreed that knowledge about writing is certain, and were equally split about whether writing knowledge comes from authorities and experts. On average, teachers applied the twenty-two instructional writing practices surveyed at least once a month. They reported their students wrote weekly, and their writing was supported through goal setting, feedback, and prewriting activities. Writing instruction mostly focuses on teaching grammar and how to plan compositions. Teacher self-efficacy uniquely and statistically predicted reported teaching practices after attitude toward writing, and epistemological beliefs were first controlled. Recommendations for future research and implications for practice are presented.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)438-450
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education
Volume26
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 14 2021

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Speech and Hearing

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