Does citation analysis help or hinder the professional development of social workers and their profession? A reply to Slater, Scourfield and Sloan

David Hodge, Jeffrey R. Lacasse

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This article responds to Slater, Scourfield and Sloan's assessment and analysis of our earlier British Journal of Social Work article delineating the 100 most highly cited articles in disciplinary social work journals during the past decade. We address two primary issues in our response. First, we provide background on the circumstances that animated the larger research agenda from which the BJSW article emanated. Second, we discuss how the authors' empirical work illustrates the potential of citation analysis to spark conversations that facilitate professional reflection and growth. We conclude by noting that every method is characterised by a certain set of limitations and that citation analysis has the potential to assist both social workers and their profession if used appropriately.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)469-472
Number of pages4
JournalBritish Journal of Social Work
Volume44
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

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Social Work
social worker
profession
social work
conversation
Growth
Research
Social Workers

Keywords

  • Bibliometrics
  • highly cited articles
  • methodological limitations
  • professional discourse

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Health(social science)

Cite this

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