Doctors' Attentiveness to the Spirituality/Religion of their Patients in Pediatric and Oncology Settings in the Northwest USA

Stephen D W King, Martha A. Dimmers, Shelby Langer, Patricia E. Murphy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Research indicates that spirituality/religion is important to many patients and they want this to be an integrated component of their care. This study's aim was to better understand doctors' attentiveness to patients'/families' spiritual/religious concerns and the contributing factors for this in the Northwest USA as well as doctor's attitudes about referrals to chaplains. Study participants included 108 pediatricians and oncologists who completed an online self-report questionnaire regarding their beliefs about the health relevance of patients' spirituality/religion and their attentiveness to this. Few doctors routinely addressed this concern. Doctors who were Christian, did not expect negative reactions to inquiring, and were knowledgeable regarding chaplains were more likely to address spirituality/religion. Doctors who felt less adequate in addressing spirituality/religion and were concerned about patients negative reactions were less likely to value referral to chaplains. On the other hand, those who had an understanding regarding chaplains were more likely to support referral.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)140-164
Number of pages25
JournalJournal of Health Care Chaplaincy
Volume19
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Clergy
Spirituality
Religion
spirituality
Pediatrics
Referral and Consultation
Self Report
Oncology
Doctors
questionnaire
Health
health
Research
Chaplain
Values

Keywords

  • medical education
  • physician or patient-physician communication
  • religion
  • spirituality
  • spirituality/religion in medicine or health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Health(social science)
  • Religious studies

Cite this

Doctors' Attentiveness to the Spirituality/Religion of their Patients in Pediatric and Oncology Settings in the Northwest USA. / King, Stephen D W; Dimmers, Martha A.; Langer, Shelby; Murphy, Patricia E.

In: Journal of Health Care Chaplaincy, Vol. 19, No. 4, 10.2013, p. 140-164.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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