Do trait anxiety scores reveal information about our response to anxious situations? A psycho-physiological VR study

Ramesh Tadayon, Chetan Gupta, Debra Crews, Troy McDaniel

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

As the consequences of anxiety and depression have been compared to obesity and smoking as predictors of physical health, further findings, more advancements, and new technology are necessary to help those struggling with psychological disorders such as anxiety. This study investigates the potential relationships between Trait Anxiety or general anxiety scores and physiological and perceived reactions to a simulated virtual reality (VR) experience that induces mild anxiety as well as the ability to recover from the anxious event. The study additionally explores a potential relationship of a medical diagnosis on the physiological and perceived reactions to the simulated environment designed to induce mild anxiety and the potential effect on the ability to recover from such an event. Eighteen adults participated in the IRB (Institutional Review Board) approved study by completing a consent form, followed by the Trait Anxiety Questionnaire corresponding to the State Trait Anxiety Inventory form Y-2 to assess general anxiety levels. Participants additionally recorded a self-reflected Likert-scale interpretation of their perceived anxiety on a scale of one to ten after each phase of the study (Baseline, Introduction, Virtual Reality, Recovery). The experiment was designed to elicit mild anxiety with an ambiguous introduction and a shocking VR experience. The results showed no statistically significant difference between those with higher general anxiety with Trait Anxiety scores above 40 and those with lower Trait Anxiety in their percent increase of heart rate and increase of self-reflected anxiety score between baseline and VR phases as well as between baseline and recovery phases. Additionally, participants with medical diagnoses of anxiety showed no statistically significant difference in their percent increase of heart rate from baseline to VR phases as well as from baseline to recovery phases than their counterparts without any diagnoses of anxiety disorders. There is a potential indication, however, of a possible pattern of individuals with higher general anxiety (Trait Anxiety scores above 40) having a less-severe reaction, physiologically and perceptively, to an anxious situation than individuals with lower Trait Anxiety scores. This could indicate the possibility of desensitization to anxiety with frequent exposure. Conclusions of this study call for further investigation into this potential pattern and evaluation of future assistive technologies for individuals with anxiety.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationHealthMedia 2019 - Proceedings of the 4th International Workshop on Multimedia for Personal Health and Health Care, co-located with MM 2019
PublisherAssociation for Computing Machinery, Inc
Pages16-23
Number of pages8
ISBN (Electronic)9781450369145
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 15 2019
Event4th International Workshop for Multimedia for Personal Health and Health Care, HealthMedia 2019, in conjunction with ACM Multimedia 2019 - Nice, France
Duration: Oct 21 2019 → …

Publication series

NameHealthMedia 2019 - Proceedings of the 4th International Workshop on Multimedia for Personal Health and Health Care, co-located with MM 2019

Conference

Conference4th International Workshop for Multimedia for Personal Health and Health Care, HealthMedia 2019, in conjunction with ACM Multimedia 2019
CountryFrance
CityNice
Period10/21/19 → …

Fingerprint

Virtual reality
Recovery
Health
Experiments

Keywords

  • Anxiety
  • Electroencephalography
  • Gamma band
  • Generalized anxiety disorder
  • Psychophysiology
  • Psychotherapy
  • Virtual reality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Graphics and Computer-Aided Design
  • Human-Computer Interaction

Cite this

Tadayon, R., Gupta, C., Crews, D., & McDaniel, T. (2019). Do trait anxiety scores reveal information about our response to anxious situations? A psycho-physiological VR study. In HealthMedia 2019 - Proceedings of the 4th International Workshop on Multimedia for Personal Health and Health Care, co-located with MM 2019 (pp. 16-23). (HealthMedia 2019 - Proceedings of the 4th International Workshop on Multimedia for Personal Health and Health Care, co-located with MM 2019). Association for Computing Machinery, Inc. https://doi.org/10.1145/3347444.3356239

Do trait anxiety scores reveal information about our response to anxious situations? A psycho-physiological VR study. / Tadayon, Ramesh; Gupta, Chetan; Crews, Debra; McDaniel, Troy.

HealthMedia 2019 - Proceedings of the 4th International Workshop on Multimedia for Personal Health and Health Care, co-located with MM 2019. Association for Computing Machinery, Inc, 2019. p. 16-23 (HealthMedia 2019 - Proceedings of the 4th International Workshop on Multimedia for Personal Health and Health Care, co-located with MM 2019).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Tadayon, R, Gupta, C, Crews, D & McDaniel, T 2019, Do trait anxiety scores reveal information about our response to anxious situations? A psycho-physiological VR study. in HealthMedia 2019 - Proceedings of the 4th International Workshop on Multimedia for Personal Health and Health Care, co-located with MM 2019. HealthMedia 2019 - Proceedings of the 4th International Workshop on Multimedia for Personal Health and Health Care, co-located with MM 2019, Association for Computing Machinery, Inc, pp. 16-23, 4th International Workshop for Multimedia for Personal Health and Health Care, HealthMedia 2019, in conjunction with ACM Multimedia 2019, Nice, France, 10/21/19. https://doi.org/10.1145/3347444.3356239
Tadayon R, Gupta C, Crews D, McDaniel T. Do trait anxiety scores reveal information about our response to anxious situations? A psycho-physiological VR study. In HealthMedia 2019 - Proceedings of the 4th International Workshop on Multimedia for Personal Health and Health Care, co-located with MM 2019. Association for Computing Machinery, Inc. 2019. p. 16-23. (HealthMedia 2019 - Proceedings of the 4th International Workshop on Multimedia for Personal Health and Health Care, co-located with MM 2019). https://doi.org/10.1145/3347444.3356239
Tadayon, Ramesh ; Gupta, Chetan ; Crews, Debra ; McDaniel, Troy. / Do trait anxiety scores reveal information about our response to anxious situations? A psycho-physiological VR study. HealthMedia 2019 - Proceedings of the 4th International Workshop on Multimedia for Personal Health and Health Care, co-located with MM 2019. Association for Computing Machinery, Inc, 2019. pp. 16-23 (HealthMedia 2019 - Proceedings of the 4th International Workshop on Multimedia for Personal Health and Health Care, co-located with MM 2019).
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