Do report cards influence hospital choice? The case of kidney transplantation

David H. Howard, Bruce Kaplan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The national program to report hospital-level outcomes for transplantation has been in place since 1991, yet it has not been addressed in the existing literature on hospital report cards. We study the impact of reported outcomes on demand at kidney transplant centers. Using a negative binomial regression with hospital fixed effects, we estimate the number of patients choosing each center as a function of reported outcomes. Parameters are identified by the within-hospital variation in outcomes over five successive report cards. We find some evidence that report cards influence younger and college-educated patients, but, overall, report cards do not affect demand.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)150-159
Number of pages10
JournalInquiry
Volume43
Issue number2
StatePublished - Jun 2006
Externally publishedYes

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Kidney Transplantation
demand
Transplantation
Transplants
Kidney
regression
evidence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)
  • Health(social science)
  • Health Professions(all)
  • Health Policy

Cite this

Howard, D. H., & Kaplan, B. (2006). Do report cards influence hospital choice? The case of kidney transplantation. Inquiry, 43(2), 150-159.

Do report cards influence hospital choice? The case of kidney transplantation. / Howard, David H.; Kaplan, Bruce.

In: Inquiry, Vol. 43, No. 2, 06.2006, p. 150-159.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Howard, DH & Kaplan, B 2006, 'Do report cards influence hospital choice? The case of kidney transplantation', Inquiry, vol. 43, no. 2, pp. 150-159.
Howard, David H. ; Kaplan, Bruce. / Do report cards influence hospital choice? The case of kidney transplantation. In: Inquiry. 2006 ; Vol. 43, No. 2. pp. 150-159.
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