Do positive peer relations mitigate transactions between depressive symptoms and peer victimization in adolescence?

Karen P. Kochel, Catherine L. Bagwell, Gary Ladd, Karen D. Rudolph

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study's purpose was to evaluate whether two aspects of positive peer relations-having a friend and being well-liked-mitigate prospective transactions between depressive symptoms and peer victimization. Participants were early adolescents in fifth and sixth grades (N =483; 50% girls; M age in 5th grade spring=11.10years; SD =0.40) and late adolescents in ninth and tenth grades (N =444; 52% girls; M age in 9th grade spring=14.70years; SD =0.62). Data were collected in the spring annually. Depressive symptoms were assessed via parent-, teacher-, and self-reports (late adolescence only) and peer victimization by self-, peer-, and teacher-reports. Mutual friendship nominations and peer acceptance ratings indexed positive peer relations. Results showed that positive peer relations are protective: Depressive symptoms contributed to peer victimization for early and late adolescents without a friend; moreover, late adolescents high on acceptance were at decreased risk for peer victimization.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Applied Developmental Psychology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Aug 3 2016

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

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