Do Nonprofit Missions Vary by the Political Ideology of Supporting Communities? Some Preliminary Results

Jesse Lecy, Shena R. Ashley, Francisco J. Santamarina

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Nonprofit missions reflect the values of those that create, manage, and support them. We know that the U.S. population has undergone a “big sort” that has resulted in increased community homogeneity along racial, economic, and political lines. We do not know, however, how this process has impacted the nonprofit sector, as there is little work looking at the geographic distribution of nonprofit missions as a function of the demographics of communities in which they operate. To identify the effects of community values on the nonprofit mission, we use landslide voting districts as a proxy for political ideology and propensity score matching to pair districts with statistically equivalent demographic characteristics. Nonprofits in matched voting districts are compared to identify differences in activities, mission, and funding. Missions shape how communities allocate resources to target populations and interest groups, so observed differences in mission may help explain variation in social outcomes across communities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)115-141
Number of pages27
JournalPublic Performance and Management Review
Volume42
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2 2019

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political ideology
community
district
voting
non-profit sector
population group
know how
interest group
Values
funding
Political ideology
resources
economics

Keywords

  • demographic sorting
  • nonprofit mission
  • political ideology
  • propensity score matching
  • public goods

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Administration
  • Strategy and Management

Cite this

Do Nonprofit Missions Vary by the Political Ideology of Supporting Communities? Some Preliminary Results. / Lecy, Jesse; Ashley, Shena R.; Santamarina, Francisco J.

In: Public Performance and Management Review, Vol. 42, No. 1, 02.01.2019, p. 115-141.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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