Do Neighborhood and Home Contexts Help Explain Why Low-Income Children Miss Opportunities to Participate in Activities Outside of School?

Eric Dearing, Christopher Wimer, Sandra D. Simpkins, Terese Lund, Suzanne M. Bouffard, Pia Caronongan, Holly Kreider, Heather Weiss

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

In this study, children's participation (N = 1,420) in activities outside of elementary school was examined as a function of disparities in family income using data from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics, Child Development Supplement. Children's neighborhood and home environments were investigated as mechanisms linking income disparities and participation rates. Family income was positively associated with children's participation in activities, with the largest effect sizes evident for children at the lowest end of the income distribution. Affluence in the neighborhood and cognitive stimulation in the home were both important mediators of the association between income and participation, explaining from approximately one tenth to one half of the estimated associations between income and participation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1545-1562
Number of pages18
JournalDevelopmental psychology
Volume45
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2009

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Keywords

  • family
  • middle childhood
  • neighborhood
  • out-of-school activities
  • poverty

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Demography
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

Cite this

Dearing, E., Wimer, C., Simpkins, S. D., Lund, T., Bouffard, S. M., Caronongan, P., Kreider, H., & Weiss, H. (2009). Do Neighborhood and Home Contexts Help Explain Why Low-Income Children Miss Opportunities to Participate in Activities Outside of School? Developmental psychology, 45(6), 1545-1562. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0017359