Do mothers' perceptions and concerns about preschoolers' peer competence predict their peer‐management practices?

Susan M. Profilet, Gary Ladd

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although parents' management behaviors have been associated with children's competence with peers, relatively little is known about factors that may determine parents' management practices. In this study, measures of mothers' perceptions and concerns, mother' peer‐related management practices, and children's social competence were obtained with 62 preschool children and their mothers. Results indicated that mothers differentiated between prosocial behavior and peer sociability when assessing children's progress relative to peers. Girls received higher progress ratings from their mothers than did boys, and mothers tended to view their children's prosocial skills as less well developed than their sociability toward peers. Mothers who reported lower estimates of their children's sociability tended to have higher levels of concern and were less involved in the management of their children's informal peer relations. Conversely, mothers who managed children's social lives by facilitating informal peer activities and promoting children's social autonomy tended to see their children as more sociable with peers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)205-221
Number of pages17
JournalSocial Development
Volume3
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1994
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Mental Competency
Mothers
sociability
Practice Management
management
parents
Parents
social competence
Preschool Children
preschool child
autonomy
rating

Keywords

  • Maternal perceptions
  • parental management
  • social competence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

Do mothers' perceptions and concerns about preschoolers' peer competence predict their peer‐management practices? / Profilet, Susan M.; Ladd, Gary.

In: Social Development, Vol. 3, No. 3, 1994, p. 205-221.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{9093665b4dcf4b938a4fa42e7464ef7a,
title = "Do mothers' perceptions and concerns about preschoolers' peer competence predict their peer‐management practices?",
abstract = "Although parents' management behaviors have been associated with children's competence with peers, relatively little is known about factors that may determine parents' management practices. In this study, measures of mothers' perceptions and concerns, mother' peer‐related management practices, and children's social competence were obtained with 62 preschool children and their mothers. Results indicated that mothers differentiated between prosocial behavior and peer sociability when assessing children's progress relative to peers. Girls received higher progress ratings from their mothers than did boys, and mothers tended to view their children's prosocial skills as less well developed than their sociability toward peers. Mothers who reported lower estimates of their children's sociability tended to have higher levels of concern and were less involved in the management of their children's informal peer relations. Conversely, mothers who managed children's social lives by facilitating informal peer activities and promoting children's social autonomy tended to see their children as more sociable with peers.",
keywords = "Maternal perceptions, parental management, social competence",
author = "Profilet, {Susan M.} and Gary Ladd",
year = "1994",
doi = "10.1111/j.1467-9507.1994.tb00041.x",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "3",
pages = "205--221",
journal = "Social Development",
issn = "0961-205X",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Do mothers' perceptions and concerns about preschoolers' peer competence predict their peer‐management practices?

AU - Profilet, Susan M.

AU - Ladd, Gary

PY - 1994

Y1 - 1994

N2 - Although parents' management behaviors have been associated with children's competence with peers, relatively little is known about factors that may determine parents' management practices. In this study, measures of mothers' perceptions and concerns, mother' peer‐related management practices, and children's social competence were obtained with 62 preschool children and their mothers. Results indicated that mothers differentiated between prosocial behavior and peer sociability when assessing children's progress relative to peers. Girls received higher progress ratings from their mothers than did boys, and mothers tended to view their children's prosocial skills as less well developed than their sociability toward peers. Mothers who reported lower estimates of their children's sociability tended to have higher levels of concern and were less involved in the management of their children's informal peer relations. Conversely, mothers who managed children's social lives by facilitating informal peer activities and promoting children's social autonomy tended to see their children as more sociable with peers.

AB - Although parents' management behaviors have been associated with children's competence with peers, relatively little is known about factors that may determine parents' management practices. In this study, measures of mothers' perceptions and concerns, mother' peer‐related management practices, and children's social competence were obtained with 62 preschool children and their mothers. Results indicated that mothers differentiated between prosocial behavior and peer sociability when assessing children's progress relative to peers. Girls received higher progress ratings from their mothers than did boys, and mothers tended to view their children's prosocial skills as less well developed than their sociability toward peers. Mothers who reported lower estimates of their children's sociability tended to have higher levels of concern and were less involved in the management of their children's informal peer relations. Conversely, mothers who managed children's social lives by facilitating informal peer activities and promoting children's social autonomy tended to see their children as more sociable with peers.

KW - Maternal perceptions

KW - parental management

KW - social competence

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84987216265&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84987216265&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/j.1467-9507.1994.tb00041.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1467-9507.1994.tb00041.x

M3 - Article

VL - 3

SP - 205

EP - 221

JO - Social Development

JF - Social Development

SN - 0961-205X

IS - 3

ER -