Do Employers' Responses to Crises Impact Men and Women Differently? Firm-level Evidence from Indonesia

Mary Hallward-Driemeier, Bob Rijkers, Andrew Waxman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Do employers' responses to crises impact men and women differently? Using manufacturing census data from Indonesia this paper assesses gender differences in the impact of the East Asian crisis and to what extent these were due to differential treatment of men and women within firms and gender sorting across firms that varied in their exposure to the crisis. On average, women experienced higher job losses than their male colleagues within the same firm. However, the aggregate adverse effect of such differential treatment was more than offset by women being disproportionately employed in firms hit relatively less hard by the crisis. The null hypothesis that there were no gender differences in wage adjustment is not rejected.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalReview of Development Economics
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2016
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Indonesia
employer
firm
gender
evidence
gender-specific factors
job loss
wage
sorting
census
manufacturing
woman

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Development

Cite this

Do Employers' Responses to Crises Impact Men and Women Differently? Firm-level Evidence from Indonesia. / Hallward-Driemeier, Mary; Rijkers, Bob; Waxman, Andrew.

In: Review of Development Economics, 2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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