Diverse single-stranded DNA viruses identified in New Zealand (Aotearoa) South Island robin (Petroica australis) fecal samples

Joy M. Custer, Robyn White, Helen Taylor, Kara Schmidlin, Rafaela S. Fontenele, Daisy Stainton, Simona Kraberger, James V. Briskie, Arvind Varsani

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The South Island robin (Petroica australis) is a small passerine bird endemic to New Zealand (Aotearoa). Although its population has declined recently and it is considered ‘at risk,’ little research has been done to identify viruses in this species. This study aimed to survey the diversity of single-stranded DNA viruses associated with South Island robins in a small, isolated population on Nukuwaiata Island. In total, 108 DNA viruses were identified from pooled fecal samples collected from 38 individual robins sampled. These viruses belong to the Circoviridae (n = 10), Genomoviridae (n = 12), and Microviridae (n = 73) families. A number of genomes that belong to the phylum Cressdnaviricota but are otherwise unclassified (n = 13) were also identified. These results greatly expand the known viral diversity associated with South Island robins, and we identify a novel group of viruses most closely related genomoviruses.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)38-51
Number of pages14
JournalVirology
Volume565
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2 2022

Keywords

  • Circoviridae
  • Cressdnaviricota
  • Genomoviridae
  • Microviridae
  • Nukuwaiata island
  • Petroica australis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Virology

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