Distinguishing neighbourhood and workplace network effects on individual income: evidence from Sweden

Charlotta Mellander, Kevin Stolarick, Jose Lobo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Distinguishing neighbourhood and workplace network effects on individual income: evidence from Sweden. Regional Studies. This paper investigates the effects on individuals’ income of two social networks in which individuals are embedded: their residential neighbourhood and their workplace. The paper avails itself of Swedish micro-level data, which make it possible to identify individual workers, and with whom they live next to and work. The spatial extent of the non-workplace social network–from block group to the whole of a metropolitan area–is varied to examine which social community most affects an individual’s income. The paper distinguishes between individuals engaged in high- and low-skilled occupations so as to starkly control for differences in education, training and skills. The results suggest that residential neighbourhoods do matter for individuals’ income, although the effect is stronger for low-skilled individuals. For both high- and low-skilled individuals, their workplace group skill has the greatest effect on income, but the effect is negative for high-skilled and positive for low-skilled individuals.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1652-1664
Number of pages13
JournalRegional Studies
Volume51
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2 2017

Fingerprint

workplace
Sweden
income
evidence
education and training
social network
occupation
effect
micro level
Group
geography
worker

Keywords

  • high-skilled occupations
  • income
  • neighbourhoods
  • network effects
  • workplace

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Social Sciences(all)

Cite this

Distinguishing neighbourhood and workplace network effects on individual income : evidence from Sweden. / Mellander, Charlotta; Stolarick, Kevin; Lobo, Jose.

In: Regional Studies, Vol. 51, No. 11, 02.11.2017, p. 1652-1664.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mellander, Charlotta ; Stolarick, Kevin ; Lobo, Jose. / Distinguishing neighbourhood and workplace network effects on individual income : evidence from Sweden. In: Regional Studies. 2017 ; Vol. 51, No. 11. pp. 1652-1664.
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