Disordered Gambling as Defined by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders and the South Oaks Gambling Screen: Evidence for a Common Etiologic Structure

Wendy S. Slutske, Gu Zhu, Madeline H. Meier, Nicholas G. Martin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

24 Scopus citations

Abstract

In a previous article, we demonstrated in a large twin study that disordered gambling (DG), as defined by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed.; DSM-IV), ran in families, that about half of the variation in liability for DG was due to familial factors, and that all of this was explained by shared genetic rather than shared environmental influences (Slutske, Zhu, Meier, & Martin, 2010). The purpose of the present study is to extend this work to include an alternative conceptualization of DG that is provided by the South Oaks Gambling Screen (SOGS) item set in order to (a) compare the magnitude of the familial resemblance obtained when using the two definitions of DG (based on the DSM-IV and the SOGS), (b) examine the extent to which the 2 definitions tap the same underlying sources of genetic and environmental variation, and (c) examine whether the same results will be obtained among men and women. The results of bivariate twin model-fitting analyses suggested that DG, as defined by the DSM-IV and the SOGS, substantially overlapped at the etiologic level among both men and women, which supports the construct validity of both the DSM and the SOGS conceptualizations of DG. This study highlights the utility of twin studies for appraising the validity of the diagnostic nomenclature.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)743-751
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Abnormal Psychology
Volume120
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2011
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Disordered gambling
  • Genetic influences
  • Pathological gambling
  • South Oaks Gambling Screen
  • Twin study

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Biological Psychiatry

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