Discrimination of rippled-spectrum noise from flat-spectrum noise by chinchillas: Evidence for a spectral dominance region

William P. Shofner, William A. Yost

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Scopus citations

Abstract

Iterated rippled noise having infinite iterations is generated when a flat-spectrum wideband noise is delayed T ms and the delayed version is added to the undelayed noise through positive feedback. The resulting signal has a rippled spectrum and the perceived pitch of this iterated rippled noise by human listeners corresponds to a frequency of 1/T. We have previously, demonstrated that chinchillas can discriminate the rippled-spectrum noise from the flat-spectrum noise. In the present study, chinchillas discriminated a bandpass tiltered rippled spectrum noise from a bandpass flat-spectrum noise in a psychophysical task. The passbands were set to be one octave wide. Psychometric functions were obtained for 5 chinchillas and performance was measured as d'. The best behavioral performance was obtained when the center frequency of the bandpass filter generally corresponded to the 3rd-5th harmonic peak of the rippled noise (i.e. at 3/T to 5/T), but the presice location of the dominant region varied with the delay of the rippled noise such that the dominance region tended to shift to lower harmonics as 1/T increased. These results indicate that not all spectral regions are weighted equally in the discrimination task. The spectral dominance region found in chinchillas is similar to that described for human pitch perception.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)15-24
Number of pages10
JournalHearing Research
Volume110
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 1997
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Chinchilla
  • Dominance region
  • Pitch
  • Rippled noise

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sensory Systems

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