Discrimination of first- and second-order regular intervals from random intervals as a function of high-pass filter cutoff frequency (L)

William Yost, Dan Mapes-Riordan, Raymond Dye, Stanley Sheft, William Shofner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study extends the work of Kaernbach and Demany [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 104, 2998-2306 (1998)] in which regular interval stimuli (RIS) click trains with first-order intervals could be discriminated from random-interval click trains, but RIS with second-order intervals could not. Kaernbach and Demany concluded that their results cast doubt on autocorrelation as a method of analysis for such stimuli. The present study investigated the same stimuli, but for a variety of filter conditions. The results suggest that while RIS click trains with first-order intervals are more easily discriminated from random-interval stimuli than second-order interval RIS click trains, discrimination based on second-order intervals is possible except when the stimuli are high-pass filtered above 8 kHz, i.e., above the spectral region of phase locking.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)59-62
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of the Acoustical Society of America
Volume117
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2005
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

high pass filters
discrimination
cut-off
stimuli
intervals
Regular
Filter
Discrimination
Stimulus
locking
autocorrelation
casts

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Acoustics and Ultrasonics

Cite this

Discrimination of first- and second-order regular intervals from random intervals as a function of high-pass filter cutoff frequency (L). / Yost, William; Mapes-Riordan, Dan; Dye, Raymond; Sheft, Stanley; Shofner, William.

In: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, Vol. 117, No. 1, 01.01.2005, p. 59-62.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{c38f4971cc4a4fdeab57cd4e3d8a1635,
title = "Discrimination of first- and second-order regular intervals from random intervals as a function of high-pass filter cutoff frequency (L)",
abstract = "This study extends the work of Kaernbach and Demany [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 104, 2998-2306 (1998)] in which regular interval stimuli (RIS) click trains with first-order intervals could be discriminated from random-interval click trains, but RIS with second-order intervals could not. Kaernbach and Demany concluded that their results cast doubt on autocorrelation as a method of analysis for such stimuli. The present study investigated the same stimuli, but for a variety of filter conditions. The results suggest that while RIS click trains with first-order intervals are more easily discriminated from random-interval stimuli than second-order interval RIS click trains, discrimination based on second-order intervals is possible except when the stimuli are high-pass filtered above 8 kHz, i.e., above the spectral region of phase locking.",
author = "William Yost and Dan Mapes-Riordan and Raymond Dye and Stanley Sheft and William Shofner",
year = "2005",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1121/1.1830671",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "117",
pages = "59--62",
journal = "Journal of the Acoustical Society of America",
issn = "0001-4966",
publisher = "Acoustical Society of America",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Discrimination of first- and second-order regular intervals from random intervals as a function of high-pass filter cutoff frequency (L)

AU - Yost, William

AU - Mapes-Riordan, Dan

AU - Dye, Raymond

AU - Sheft, Stanley

AU - Shofner, William

PY - 2005/1/1

Y1 - 2005/1/1

N2 - This study extends the work of Kaernbach and Demany [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 104, 2998-2306 (1998)] in which regular interval stimuli (RIS) click trains with first-order intervals could be discriminated from random-interval click trains, but RIS with second-order intervals could not. Kaernbach and Demany concluded that their results cast doubt on autocorrelation as a method of analysis for such stimuli. The present study investigated the same stimuli, but for a variety of filter conditions. The results suggest that while RIS click trains with first-order intervals are more easily discriminated from random-interval stimuli than second-order interval RIS click trains, discrimination based on second-order intervals is possible except when the stimuli are high-pass filtered above 8 kHz, i.e., above the spectral region of phase locking.

AB - This study extends the work of Kaernbach and Demany [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 104, 2998-2306 (1998)] in which regular interval stimuli (RIS) click trains with first-order intervals could be discriminated from random-interval click trains, but RIS with second-order intervals could not. Kaernbach and Demany concluded that their results cast doubt on autocorrelation as a method of analysis for such stimuli. The present study investigated the same stimuli, but for a variety of filter conditions. The results suggest that while RIS click trains with first-order intervals are more easily discriminated from random-interval stimuli than second-order interval RIS click trains, discrimination based on second-order intervals is possible except when the stimuli are high-pass filtered above 8 kHz, i.e., above the spectral region of phase locking.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=12344249997&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=12344249997&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1121/1.1830671

DO - 10.1121/1.1830671

M3 - Article

C2 - 15704397

AN - SCOPUS:12344249997

VL - 117

SP - 59

EP - 62

JO - Journal of the Acoustical Society of America

JF - Journal of the Acoustical Society of America

SN - 0001-4966

IS - 1

ER -