Discrimination and Depressive Symptoms Among Mexican American Women: Exploring Multilevel Sociocultural Moderators

Sarah G. Curci, Juan C. Hernández, Laura K. Winstone, Marisol Perez, Linda J. Luecken

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Relative to empirical studies on risk factors, less research has focused on culturally based protective factors that reduce the impact of discrimination on mental health. The current prospective study evaluated two potential moderators of the effect of discrimination on depressive symptoms among Mexican American women: individually held familism values and neighborhood cultural cohesion. Mexican-origin women in the United States (N = 322; mean age = 27.8 years; 86% born in Mexico) reported on frequency of discrimination, depressive symptoms, familism, and neighborhood cultural cohesion. Independent models evaluated familism and neighborhood cultural cohesion as moderators of the effect of discrimination on subsequent depressive symptoms. More frequent discrimination predicted higher subsequent depressive symptoms. High familism buffered the harmful effect of discrimination on depressive symptoms, such that more frequent discrimination was associated with higher subsequent depressive symptoms only for women who reported average and low familism. Neighborhood cultural cohesion did not buffer the effect of discrimination on depressive symptoms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalClinical Psychological Science
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2022

Keywords

  • depressive symptoms
  • discrimination
  • familism
  • Mexican American women
  • neighborhood cultural cohesion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Discrimination and Depressive Symptoms Among Mexican American Women: Exploring Multilevel Sociocultural Moderators'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this