Discrepant patterns of heavy drinking, Marijuana use, and smoking and intimate partner violence: Results from the California community health study of couples

Carol B. Cunradi, Michael Todd, Christina Mair

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study analyzed whether discrepant (husband or wife use only) or concordant (both partners use) patterns of heavy drinking, marijuana use, and smoking are associated with increased risk for male-to-female partner violence and female-to-male partner violence among adult couples. Based on a geographic sample of married or cohabiting couples residing in 50 California cities, logistic regression analyses were conducted using dyadic data on past-year partner violence, binge drinking and frequency of intoxication, marijuana use, and smoking. When all substance use patterns were included simultaneously, wife-only heavy drinking couples were at elevated risk for male-to-female partner violence, as were concordant marijuana-using couples. Husband-only marijuana discrepant couples were at increased risk for female-to-male partner violence. Further research is needed to explore the processes by which discrepant and concordant substance use patterns may contribute to partner aggression.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)73-95
Number of pages23
JournalJournal of drug education
Volume45
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2015

Keywords

  • Discrepant patterns
  • Drinking
  • Intimate partner violence
  • Marijuana use
  • Smoking

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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